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Class Schedule - Oregon - Roseburg, OR

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Improving Safety at Intersections is a 3.5-hour class.  Intersection crashes can be significantly reduced in Tribal lands by the application of proven safety measures for rural and urban intersections.   This class presents examples of intersection safety countermeasures for design, operations, and low-cost safety improvements.   Examples are presented along with their specific safety benefits in the form of crash reduction factors.  Topics covered include: seven characteristics of a safe intersection, different types of intersections used to manage traffic, common geometric problems that could be a safety risk and how to fix them, how to use signage for intersections, and how to maintain sight triangles.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to: 1. Describe the cost in lives for crashes at intersections. 2. Identify seven characteristics that make an intersection safe. 3. Describe the types of traffic control used to manage different volumes of vehicles through intersections. 4. Understand the features that describe the geometry of an intersection and how they influence motorists. 5. Identify common geometric problems that could create a safety risk and how to fix them. 6. Understand how to use signs correctly to improve safety at intersections. 7. List different types of countermeasures to improve intersection safety and how to how to implement them. 8. Describe the importance of sight triangles and how to calculate them. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Intersection Tribal Crash Data – The Why 

Module 2: The Evolution of an Intersection 

Module 3: Flaws in Your Intersection 

Module 4: Signs -- Do it Right or Pay the Price 

Module 5: Low Cost Safety Countermeasures 

Module 6: Sight Distance 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public at intersections.  Attendees will gain the knowledge of how to make intersections safer, reducing injuries and fatalities. 

In Indian Country, the most common type of crash is the run-off-the-road crash. The impact on the vehicle when it leaves the road determines the survivability of that crash. Railroad grade crossings represent another common crash location for tribal families. This 3.5-hour class identifies some of the hazards that are built, planted or placed in the Right of Way that can increase the severity of crashes. It will also explore some of the common problems with railroad crossings and will identify the safety features of those crossings. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing this class participants should be able to; 1. Identify the hazards that are located within the clear zone; 2. Use the intersection sight triangle to identify present and future sight issues at intersections and driveways; 3. Review an unprotected R/R grade crossing and identify the missing signs and markings; and 4. Discuss the role and the usage of a Safety Compliance Office. 

 

Agenda 

Module 1: Elements of a run off the road type of crash 

Module 2: What is the Clearzone as defined by the Roadside Design Guide? 

Module 3: How can we protect the tribal members? 

Module 4: What is the Sight Triangle of intersections and obstructions 

Module 5: R/R Grade Crossings  

Module 6: What other agencies do to protect their community 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide best practices for creating safer roads through proper management of right-of-way for managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to manage roadway right-of-way, gaining knowledge on ways to take a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads. 

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) is a 3.5-hour class condensed from Road Safety 365.  It is designed to provide Tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions into their day-to-day activities, reducing collisions, injuries, and fatalities.  If you’ve ever wondered if your work makes a difference, this class will show you how important roadway work truly is.  Topics discussed include: The need for making roads safer, Road safety myths vs. realities, How to “read the road” and improve safety in your community, and Practical and proven low cost countermeasures for safety.  Attendees will leave the workshop with a renewed spirit and the ability to make an impact for their community.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to: 1. Explain the need for making roads safer. 2. Separate safety myths from reality. 3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues. 4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects. 5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction to Low Cost Safety 

Module 2: The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data 

Module 3: Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality 

Module 4: Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community 

Module 5: Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies 

Module 6: Course Wrap Up 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. 

Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road.  Attendees will gain the knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities

Roundabouts are a proven safety solution for reducing the frequency and severity of intersection crashes and are seeing increasing use in tribal lands.  This 3.5 hour class presents an introduction to the basics of roundabout geometry, the safety and other benefits of roundabouts, how to overcome opposition, and basic design elements of roundabouts.  Participants will leave with a working knowledge of how roundabouts operate and why they are beneficial. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this Roundabouts class, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the features of a roundabout 2. Understand the operational rules of roundabouts that make them more efficient than cross intersections 3. Describe the safety benefits of roundabouts and why they work 4.  

Understand characteristics of an intersection that indicate whether or not a roundabout would be a good solution. 5. Understand common arguments used to oppose roundabouts 6. Identify crash reduction from installations 7. Describe how to set up temporary traffic control for roundabouts. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introductions 

Module 2: Roundabout Basics and Benefits 

Module 3: Safety Aspects of Roundabouts 

Module 4: Roundabout Opposition 

Module 5: Tribal Examples and Case Studies  

Module 6: Roundabout Temporary Traffic Control 

Module 7: Course Wrap Up 

 

Who should take this course: 

This class has been developed to provide information on roundabouts to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how roundabouts work and the potential safety benefits associated with their use

This 3.5-hour class will review effective pedestrian safety projects, address the need for non-data-based reviews and identify methods for addressing the needs of the tribal pedestrians and bicyclist. 

Eleven percent of all crashes that occur on tribal lands are pedestrian related.  The primary mode of transportation for a number of tribes is pedestrian and bicycle.  Therefore, a safe transportation system must address the needs of the multi-modal transportation system.  A traditional data analysis of crash data reports does not generally show the full picture of the concerns of this traveling population.  This class will review several safety projects that have been funded, address the need for non-data based reviews and identify methods for addressing not only the needs of the tribal pedestrians but also the bicyclist. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP), students should be able to:  1. Describe the importance of using good data to support a Tribal Multi-Modal Transportation Project; 2. Identify Sources of funding for Multi-modal Projects and Upgrades; 3. Analyze Crash Data for both Hot Spot and Systemic Approaches to Safety Plans; and 4. Review the current Multi-Modal Transportation System to insure that all of the low cost safety devices meet or exceed the minimum standards.‚Äč 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Multi-Modal Plan and Safe Routes to School 

Module 2: Issues for persons on foot or using bicycles 

Module 3: How can a Multi-Modal Plan reduce Fatalities 

Module 4: How a Multi-Modal Plan, Safe Routes to School and Safety Plans Interact 

Module 5: What Data is Needed 

Module 6: Data Screening 

Module 7: Systematic Multi-Modal Approach 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was designed for tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads

The goal of this 3.5- hour class is to assist tribal agencies in the development of a safety plan as well as improvement of existing safety plans. Indian Country Transportation Systems are managed by many Tribal, Federal, State and Local Agencies involved in providing a Safe and Efficient Transportation System to keep up with tribal growth and development.  This management has led to concerns by the tribes when reviewing the crash, fatal, and injuries rates within these tribal organizations.  To enable tribal areas access to Federal, State and Local funds that have been provided to assist with the tribal transportation systems, a Data/Evidence-driven decision process, a Tribal Transportation Safety Plan, needs to be developed.  This class will explore the resources provided by the Federal Highway Administration/ Lands to assist each of the tribal areas in the development of these plans, as well as exploring the data files provided by the National Transportation Highway Safety Administration for tribal lands.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Safety Plan Development, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the importance of developing a Transportation Safety Plan; 2. Explain the four E’s of Safety; 3. Describe how to develop a data and evidence-driven decision-making process; and 4. Identify the data and partnerships needed in the development of Safety Plans.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Why Elected Officials/Council need to be involved in safety planning 

Module 2: What is needed to get started 

Module 3: What resources can assist 

Module 4: How does a Safety Plan improve the transportation around my home 

 

Who should take this class: 

This training is designed for Tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads. 

 

As a tribal government reviews the intersections in the tribal road system, one of the types of intersections that are used is the signalized intersections.  This type of intersection in most cases is owned and managed by the State or Federal organizations that manage the roadways that pass through the tribal lands.  Because of this relationship, the roadway manager needs to be included in the discussions with the tribal leadership.  Due to the cost and impacts of a Signalized Intersection on the transportation system the FHWA Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) provides some strict guidance when looking at installing this type of intersectional control.  This 3.5-hour class will review those controls (Warrants) in the MUTCD, at a depth that provides a basic understanding, as well as reviewing low-cost safety improvements that can enhance the operation of an existing signalized intersections.     

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Safety Improvements for Signalized Intersection course, the participants should be able to; 1. Identify which intersections may require additional review for a possible Signalized Intersection; 2. Gain an understanding of the Warrants used to identify intersections being proposed as a signalized intersection; 3. Review a number of the low-cost safety improvements that can be used with Signalized intersections; and 4. Introduce some of the innovative intersection designs that can be used with or without signalization  to enhance the intersection.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Understanding the effect of signalization on intersection safety 

Module 2: Understanding the eight Warrants outlined in the MUTCD for signalized intersections 

Module 3: Low cost safety features that can be used on signalized intersections 

Module 4: Innovative intersection design for signalized and non-signalized intersections. 

 

Who should take this class: 

This training was designed for Tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads

In any organization, the most valued part of that organization is its employees. The only way to protect your tribal members is to identify the hazards that they work with and then mitigate those hazards. This 3.5-hour class will demonstrate the key features in developing a risk assessment and an Employees Safety program to protect those employees.   Key injury and fatality areas in both Administration and Enterprise work areas will be identified. Resources for the training and education of the workforce will also be reviewed. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing the Worker Safety class, participants will be able to; 1. Identify the hazards and risks involved in their daily work tasks; 2. Describe the five methods used to protect an employee; 3. Understand the importance of developing and managing an Employee Safety Plan; 4. Demonstrate the tools available to the organization when planning for your employee’s safety.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Key safety concerns for most organizations 

Module 2: High risk type of work. 

Module 3: Five key elements in protecting an Employee. 

Module 4: Workshop on using the five key elements to Safety 

Module 5: Example of Safety Concerns 

Module 6: Resources available. 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, office staff, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the dangers found on the job site and in the workplace.  Attendees will begin to think about safety every day on every job, reducing the risk of serious injury or death. 

Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (DTTIP) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session. It is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging. Students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years. Coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding will be discussed. The process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists will be reviewed. Students will become familiar with ways to use the FHWA TTIP template and reshape to create their own TTIP.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to:
1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding.
2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists.
3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template.

Agenda:

• Your Transportation Improvement Plan
• What is in My TTIP?
• How Do I Use the TTIP Template?
• The Next Steps of TTIP

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders; tribal planners and anyone involved with tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

LCSI is designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions to reduce collisions, injuries, and fatalities. Students will learn how to ‘read the road’ and identify roadway safety issues. A review of practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road construction, will be provided.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the need for making roads safer.
2. Separate safety myths from reality.
3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues.
4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects.
5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise.

Agenda:

• Introduction to Low Cost Safety
• The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data
• Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality
• Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community
• Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies

Who should take this course:

This class has been developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road. Students will gain knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

This two hour asynchronous online Pipe Installation and Maintenance (PIM) class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. The proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe will be reviewed. Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options and learn effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance, students should be able to:
1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options;
2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices;
3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe;
4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices;
5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology;
6. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques;
7. Explain the importance of proper bedding;
8. Describe proper maintenance techniques.

Agenda:

• Pipe and Culvert Basics
• Trench Fundamentals
• Installation Procedures
• Culvert Maintenance

Who will benefit from the training?

Members of a roadway/bridge crew, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Procurement 101 (P101) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session that is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed as well as a demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile. Students will become familiar with the five procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”. Students will also gain understanding of the guidelines set forth in the 2 C.F.R. Cost Principles and Super Circular handout.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to:
1. Understand the consequences of not following state, local and tribal governments procurement standards.
2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.
3. Recognize the importance of awareness to guidelines as set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super circular handout.
4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.

Agenda:

• The “Birds” and the FBI
• The Bear “CLAW” of procurement standards
• The “Bees” of procurement requirements

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders, financial officers, project managers and anyone involved with administration and procurement for tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the importance of procurement requirements for federal funding.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu