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Class Schedule - Michigan - Sault Ste. Marie, MI

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The major goals of this class are to teach the skills of practicing bridge inspectors in fundamental visual inspection techniques; review the background knowledge necessary to understand how bridges function; communicate issues of national significance relative to the nations' bridge infrastructures; re-establish proper condition and appraisal rating practices; and review the professional obligations of bridge inspectors. This 3.5-hour class includes lecture, group discussion and exercises. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: 1. Identify the recent National Bridge Inspection Standards (NBIS) revisions. 2. Accurately code National Bridge Inventory (NBI) items. 3. Identify and document inspection observations using standard methods. 4.Evaluate defects based on the current AASHTO Manual for Bridge Evaluation. 5. Interpret bridge inspection report. 6. Determine if overall structure/structural member is fracture critical prone. 7. Accurately inspect and evaluate a bridge's four traffic safety features. 8. List the keys to ensuring a safe work environment.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: What is a Bridge 

Module 2: Bridge Inspection Practices/Equipment 

Module 3: National Bridge Inspection Standards 

Module 4: Bridge Defects and Deficiencies 

Module 5: Interpreting a Bridge Inspection Report (BIR) 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

Any manager responsible for maintaining bridge inventories and any maintenance worker who inspects bridges as part of their job activities should attend this class. 

Fundamentals of Bridge Maintenance teaches the participant the fundamental aspects of an effective bridge maintenance program. This 3.5-hour class explains the importance of a balanced bridge maintenance program and the organizational structure of the bridge maintenance unit. This class will review bridge maintenance management that will provide basic information about bridge inspections and reviews the general concept of Maintenance Management Systems (MMS) and Bridge Management systems (BMS).  

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: 1. Describe common organizational structures of transportation agencies, the role of the bridge maintenance unit and the various cost-effective maintenance and preservation activities that these units perform. 2.Review various bridge maintenance program management activities and tools used to facilitate the accomplishment of these activities. 3. Classify bridge components, associated elements, and their intended function for commonly used materials. 4. Review the fundamentals of bridge mechanics and behaviors. 5. Review the fundamental steps involved in using concrete as a repair material. 6. Describe general maintenance practices associated with ancillary items. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Bridge Anatomy 

Module 2: Importance of Bridge Maintenance 

Module 3: Bridge Maintenance System 

Module 4: Bridge Inspection 

Module 5: Bridge Maintenance Planning and Scheduling 

 

Who Should Take this Class: 

Any manager responsible for maintaining bridge inventories and any maintenance worker who maintains bridges and/or culverts as part of their job activities should attend this class.

This 3.5-hour class provides tribes an introduction to developing operational budgets and identifying resources to support them.  A tribal transportation department’s ability to prepare transportation budget requests, identify resource requirements while ensuring that planning and performance management remain within resource requirements is essential to maintaining a roadway network at a sustainable level of service. The desired end state of developing budgets and maintaining resources is a safe, efficient and convenient tribal roadway system for all users over the life of the transportation network.     

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of this class, participants will be able to: 1. Define Budgeting; 2. Define the purpose of budgeting; 3. Define the three types of budgets; 4. Identify the stakeholders for developing a budget; 5. Explain the budgeting process; 6. Explain the role of planning in the budget process; and 7. Identify budget resources.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: What is Budgeting 

Module 2: The Operational Budget 

Module 3: Types of Budgets 

Module 4: Planning in the Budgeting Process   

Module 5: Resources 

 

Who Should Take this Class: 

Maintenance engineers, first-level maintenance supervisors (and higher), and asset managers should attend this class. Professionals responsible for managing operational budgets, resourcing maintenance projects and treatment selection, and the monitoring of system conditions should also consider attending this class. 

This 3.5-hour class provides participants with the skills and knowledge necessary to operate basic surveying tools/instruments. Learn to record data for maintaining elevation, alignment control points and the importance of ensuring proper grades before starting your project. This class also includes practical exercises for calculating grades, solving math problems, determining contour lines, and interpreting construction plans to determine grade. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the Elevation and Grade Instruments and Use class, participants will be able to: 1. Solve math problems and perform calculations required in construction layout; 2. Explain the proper steps to set up a level; 3. Use a level to determine vertical control, to determine grade of a roadway, channel, and/or culvert; 4. Record field notes; 5. Properly read a rod; and 6. Explain the different types of surveys.     

 

Agenda 

Module 1:  History of Surveying 

Module 2:  Survey Staking 

Module 3:  Construction Plans 

Module 4:  Basic Elevation/Grades 

Module 5:  Topography 

Module 6:  Basic Construction Surveying 

Module 7:  Data Collection and Contouring  

 

Who Should Take this Class: 

This class is designed for professionals who need to sharpen basic surveying skills related to determining elevations and establishing grade.  Transportation professionals involved in roadway construction, roadway maintenance, installation and maintenance of drainage features. 

Guardrails are an important safety countermeasure, protecting motorists from serious injury if they leave the roadway. This 3.5-hour class will provide instruction on the principles and practices of guardrail installation maintenance and performance. Features necessary to provide the best likelihood for good performance for metal guardrail standard systems and their end treatments, as well as length of need (including a field expedient procedure) and guardrail transitions, will be discussed.

 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the "Roadside Safety" problem and the warrants for barrier. 2. Explain how barrier systems operate. 3.Describe the installation, repair and inspection principles necessary for proper barrier operation. 4. Describe the installation principles necessary for proper terminal operation. 5. Repair and maintenance of existing guardrails 5. Inspect barrier systems for proper installation and operation.

 

Agenda:

* Module 1- Roadside Design Guide (RDG)

* Module 2- Roadside Barrier Systems

* Module 3- Guard Rail Inspections

* Module 4- Repairs

 

Who will benefit from the course?

The maintenance team members who may now or in the future be responsible for guard rail installations or repairs.

This 3.5-hour class provides tribes an introduction to the techniques used in maintenance management systems that allow them to effectively maintain and operate a tribal roadway network.  explains the importance of a balanced bridge maintenance program and the organizational structure of the bridge maintenance unit.  The fundamental focus of an MMS is to manage routine maintenance and operations for transportation systems.  The desired end state is a safe, efficient and convenient tribal roadway system over the life of assets.    

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1. Define the role of MMS in supporting the infrastructure life cycle; 2. List three benefits of a strong maintenance program; 3. Identify the three MMS components; 4. List critical 21st century maintenance issues; 5. Identify the six phases of a MMS; 6. Describe the use of Level of Service in MMS; 7. Identify strategies for determining asset inventory items; 8. Describe techniques for setting performance targets; 9. Define maintenance; 10. Describe maintenance management; and 11. Explain the benefits of a computerized MMS. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Maintenance Management System (MMS) 

Module 2: Phases of MMS (Planning) 

Module 3: Phases of MMS (Remaining Phases) 

Module 4: Maintenance Management  

Module 5: Computerized Maintenance Management 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

Maintenance engineers, first-level maintenance supervisors (and higher), and asset managers should attend this class. Professionals responsible for directing and managing maintenance operations and budgets, maintenance project and treatment selection, and the monitoring of system conditions should also consider attending this class. 

This 3.5-hour training session is intended to help tribal and agency maintenance workers ensure that their signs are maintained to meet the needs of the road user. The principles of this class will cover types of signs, materials, supports and installation. Students will learn how to develop a sign management system to include maintenance, repair and replacement. The class will combine lectures, group discussion and practical exercises to enhance training.

 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing the sign maintenance and management class, participants should be able to: 1. Explain why traffic signs are crucial part in maintaining a road system. 2. Develop a sign management system. 3. Identify repair and replacement procedures for signs. 4. Perform maintenance to existing signs.

 

Agenda:

* Module 1- MUTCD Signage

* Module 2- Signage Retroreflectivity

* Module 3- Signage

* Module 4- Maintenance of Signage

 

Who will benefit from attending the course?

All maintenance team members who inspect, install or maintain road signs.

This 3.5-hour class provides an overview of key snow-fighter strategies to keep roads safe and passable during winter weather events, including weather forecasting resources and seasonal planning. Snow and ice-covered roads reduce vehicle maneuverability, increase travel times, obstruct visibility and impact roadway capacity. Across the country, wintry weather conditions significantly increase crash risks, accounting for nearly 25% of weather-related vehicle accidents. Often accounting for a significant portion of a community’s road budget, it is critical for road supervisors, maintenance personnel and equipment operators, whether novice or experienced, to be up-to-date on equipment, new techniques and seasonal challenges.

 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Identify best practices for winter road maintenance; 2. Distinguish between safe and unsafe practices related to snow operations; 3. Describe methods of snow and ice control, including various de-icing materials and chemicals; 4. Understand the best use of weather forecasting resources; 5. List the critical components for completing a dry run checklist and developing a snow-readiness plan.

 

Agenda:

* Module 1- Off-Season Planning, Preparation & Maintenance

* Module 2-When Winter Arrives

* Module 3-Road and Road Weather Information

* Module 4- Winter Maintenance & Snow Operations SAFETY

 

Who should attend?

All maintenance personnel involved in snow and ice removal operations.

Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (DTTIP) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session. It is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging. Students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years. Coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding will be discussed. The process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists will be reviewed. Students will become familiar with ways to use the FHWA TTIP template and reshape to create their own TTIP.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to:
1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding.
2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists.
3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template.

Agenda:

• Your Transportation Improvement Plan
• What is in My TTIP?
• How Do I Use the TTIP Template?
• The Next Steps of TTIP

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders; tribal planners and anyone involved with tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

LCSI is designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions to reduce collisions, injuries, and fatalities. Students will learn how to ‘read the road’ and identify roadway safety issues. A review of practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road construction, will be provided.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the need for making roads safer.
2. Separate safety myths from reality.
3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues.
4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects.
5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise.

Agenda:

• Introduction to Low Cost Safety
• The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data
• Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality
• Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community
• Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies

Who should take this course:

This class has been developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road. Students will gain knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

This two hour asynchronous online Pipe Installation and Maintenance (PIM) class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. The proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe will be reviewed. Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options and learn effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance, students should be able to:
1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options;
2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices;
3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe;
4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices;
5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology;
6. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques;
7. Explain the importance of proper bedding;
8. Describe proper maintenance techniques.

Agenda:

• Pipe and Culvert Basics
• Trench Fundamentals
• Installation Procedures
• Culvert Maintenance

Who will benefit from the training?

Members of a roadway/bridge crew, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Procurement 101 (P101) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session that is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed as well as a demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile. Students will become familiar with the five procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”. Students will also gain understanding of the guidelines set forth in the 2 C.F.R. Cost Principles and Super Circular handout.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to:
1. Understand the consequences of not following state, local and tribal governments procurement standards.
2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.
3. Recognize the importance of awareness to guidelines as set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super circular handout.
4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.

Agenda:

• The “Birds” and the FBI
• The Bear “CLAW” of procurement standards
• The “Bees” of procurement requirements

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders, financial officers, project managers and anyone involved with administration and procurement for tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the importance of procurement requirements for federal funding.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu