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Developing inventories of highway features allows transportation departments to manage their assets needs, ultimately leading to improved compliance with local regulations.  This 3.5-hour class introduces the reasons, benefits and techniques for developing an inventory of highway features. Combining lecture, class discussions and group exercise, the class addresses the benefits of maintaining an inventory of highway features, the proper techniques for conducting roadside inventory of highway features, common practices for utilizing asset management systems to develop an effective strategy for highway feature management.  

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the Inventory of Highway Features class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the purpose of developing an inventory of highway features; 2. Explain the highway features that should be inventoried; 3. Identify the equipment needed to conduct highway feature inventories; 4. Properly record elements of a highway feature inventory; and 5. Conduct a maintenance condition assessment.  

 

Agenda 

Module 1: Highway feature inventory 

Module 2: Highway feature terminology 

Module 3: Highway feature inventory elements 

Module 4: Data collection practices 

Module 5: Linear referencing system 

Module 6: Feature identification 

Module 7: Group exercise 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with developing an inventory of highway features is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical to the success of developing an inventory of highway features. 

Foundation for Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost GIS solutions into their day-to-day activities. Discussions will focus on the key steps to develop a basic map of road inventory.  Topics include a brief history of the use and rapid development of GIS, the current availability of low cost, full featured GIS software platforms, and the current availability of data and data types. Students will leave the class with the tools necessary to develop a basic map of their roadway assets. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Understand a basic history of GIS. 2. Describe the rapid advancement of GIS and its availability.  3. Demonstrate how to download available GIS software. 4. Demonstrate how to find, download and load data. Demonstrate how to export data to Google Earth. 5. Understand the importance of having an updated inventory in which you control and understand.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Brief history of GIS 

Module 2: Today’s GIS Environment – Open Source 

Module 3: GIS Fundamentals 

Module 4: Transform Data 

Module 5: GIS Software 

Module 6: Hands-On Training  

Module 7: Course Wrap Up 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GIS is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to acquire, manage and illustrate data.  Attendees will gain insight into modern data sources and software for the development of a digital inventory. 

Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Data Collection and Asset Management is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with a discussion on how GPS may be used in the day to day management of a network.  Review of a variety of available GPS units and their associated capabilities will be undertaken.  This hands-on class is designed for both the novice attendee with no GPS experience as well as daily users of GPS.  Attendees currently using GPS are encouraged to bring their device to the class. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Describe a variety of currently available GPS units.  2. Understand the difference between GPS Hardware and GPS Software. 3. Describe basic inputs / outputs of a GPS device.  3. Hands-on portion of the course will allow attendees to: Demonstrate how to properly set up a GPS device, record demonstrational data and export recorded data to a computer database.   

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Review of available types of GPS Hardware 

Module 2: Review of differences between types of GPS devices 

Module 3: Digitizing Data vs GPS collection 

Module 4: Review CRS/Datum/projections 

Module 5: Know what you will be collecting – know when to ‘hang it up’ 

Module 6: Transportation Asset Management Plan 

Module 7: GPS vs GIS 

Module 8: Hands on training exercise  

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GPS units is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn the background, structure and availability of today’s GPS Systems.   

 

Asset management is the strategic and systematic process of operating, maintaining, and improving physical assets with a focus on engineering and economic analysis based upon quality information. Asset management helps to identify a structured sequence of maintenance, preservation, repair, rehabilitation, and replacement actions that will achieve and sustain a desired state of good repair over the lifecycle of the assets at minimum practical cost.  A properly developed Asset and Data Management Plan (ADMP) provides Tribal leaders with a tool for making infrastructure investments and sound resource utilization decisions.  This 3.5-hour class introduces asset and data management guiding principles and key components of asset and data management to Tribal organizations.


Learning outcomes
:

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: 1. Define asset and data management; 2. Define guiding principles of asset and data management; 3. Describe the ways that an asset and data management plan is used as a communication tool with internal and external stakeholders; 4. List the typical contents of an asset and data management plan; 5. identify the strategic components of an asset and management plan; and 6. Identify key sources of information that will contribute to the development of a Tribal Asset and Management Plan.


The course content includes:

  • The use of an ADMP in transportation agencies
  • Typical content of an ADMP
  • Creating an ADMP
  • Performance measures
  • Examples of ADMPs at various levels of maturity
  • Effective ADMP communication practices

Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with an understanding of how GPS has developed into the robust system that it is today.  How we navigated before GPS, the current state of today’s GPS and how agencies may utilize existing systems will be discussed.  Whether they currently use GPS or not, attendees will leave the workshop with a deeper understanding Geographic Information Systems. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of this class, participants should be able to: 1. Explain why we use GPS.  2. Describe the methods used for navigation before GPS.  3. Demonstrate how disaster has lead innovation.  4. Review the rapid advancement of GPS and its availability.  5. Review current GPS/GNSS Systems and how they work. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Brief history of navigation before GPS 

Module 2: Putting together the pieces of a GPS System 

Module 3: The Space Race 

Module 4: Civilian Availability – Selective Availability 

Module 5: GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) 

Module 6: How many satellites does it take to determine a position?  

Module 7: GPS Errors / GPS Augmentation 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GPS units is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn the background, structure and availability of today’s GPS Systems. 

Maintenance Condition Assessment is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with a discussion on how and why you perform a basic maintenance condition assessment.  A quality management system depends upon good data, therefore the information collected must be consistent and dependable.  Developing a method for collecting roadway maintenance information in order to assess the overall condition of roadway assets provides the data to create a maintenance condition assessment.  A maintenance condition assessment allows public agencies to identify required funding levels, a strategy for prioritizing maintenance conditions and areas of excessively high or low maintenance.    

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Describe a variety of currently available GPS units.  2. Understand the difference between GPS Hardware and GPS Software. 3. Describe basic inputs / outputs of a GPS device.  3. Hands-on portion of the course will allow attendees to: Demonstrate how to properly set up a GPS device, record demonstrational data and export recorded data to a computer database.   

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Explain the definition of a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 2: Explain the purpose of a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 3: Identify the equipment needed to conduct a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 4: Identify the elements of a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 5: Record the results of a maintenance condition assessment 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with maintenance condition assessments is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical to the success of a maintenance condition assessment. 

Objective prioritization of needs is the process of managing the relative importance and urgency of different requirements to cope with the limited transportation resources. Adequate prioritization ensures the most critical requirements are addressed immediately in case time or budgets run out.  This 3.5 hour class provides an understanding of the process for managing resources to their maximum extent.  This interactive class combines classroom instruction with practical exercises and group discussion to maximize course retention.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon successful completion of the Objective Prioritization of Needs class, students will be able to: 1. Prioritize needs; 2. Conduct a needs assessment; 3. Identify project goals and objectives; 4. Identify the role of the stakeholder; 5. Identify constraints; 6. Validate needs; 6. Compare Costs; and 7. Perform gap analysis  

 

Agenda:  

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Inputs, restraints, enablers and activities of a Needs Assessment 

Module 3: Stakeholder involvement 

Module 4: Cost comparison/estimating 

Module 5: Properly identify needs 

Module 6: Validate key needs 

Module 7: Group Exercise 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with objective prioritization of needs is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical to implementing effective objective prioritization of needs. 

 

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an economic analysis tool that allows transportation officials to quantify the differential costs of alternative investment options for a given project. LCCA can be used to study either new construction projects or to examine preservation strategies for existing transportation assets. This 3.5-hour class introduces several transportation related products, treatment types and practices for life cycle cost consideration.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the Understanding Life Cycle Costs and Optimum Treatment Types class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain life cycle cost terminology; 2. Perform a life cycle cost analysis; 3. Establish alternative strategies; 4. Determine net present value for different strategies; 5. Evaluate rehabilitation activities; and 6. Discount costs and benefits annually.   

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: The use of a LCCA with existing projects and new projects 

Module 3: Alternative design treatments/options 

Module 4: Road user impacts/costs 

Module 5: Rehabilitation activities 

Module 6: Preventive maintenance activities 

Module 7: Maintenance Costs 

Module 8: Comparing typical lifespan of strategies and activities 

Module 9: Net present value 

Module 10: Group Exercise 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and analysists alike.  Previous experience with understanding life cycle costs is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical for properly performing life cycle costs analysis.

There are approximately over 1.6 million miles of unpaved roads in the United States. Cities, counties and tribal nations share a common goal and that is the desire to design safe, long-lasting roads. In this 3.5-hour Gravel Road Maintenance and Design class, supervisors and operators will gain a better understanding of the materials, techniques, and equipment needed for maintaining gravel roads. Participants will learn details about road design from construction to reshaping as well as recognizing the necessity of proper drainage. We will also describe many aspects of road maintenance from the grading process to material replacement.  This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class students should be able to: 1. Identify best practices for gravel road maintenance; 2. Describe the important of proper drainage on gravel roads; 3. List reasons for grading gravel roads; 4. Apply best practices in various road maintenance scenarios; 5. Select appropriate grading techniques needed to improve a gravel road; 6. Explain the use of culverts and how to install them; and 7. Identify techniques and applications to stabilize the road. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Why Maintenance? 

Module 2- Importance of Drainage 

Module 3- Culverts 

Module 4- Soils 

 

Who should take this class: 

Any maintenance team members that build or maintain gravel roads should take this class. 

 

This 3.5-hour class will review the installation and maintenance of erosion and sediment control devices.  Participants will become familiar with temporary erosion and sediment control devices and basic procedures for proper installation. The proper purpose and function of each device, including the required material, maintenance and typical problems, will be reviewed. Participants will gain a general understanding of storm water pollution problems and the components of a storm water pollution prevention plan.  This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercise. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completion of this Installation and Maintenance of Erosion Control Devices class, students should be able to: 1. Explain storm water pollution; 2. Define Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) and the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs); 3. List types of erosion and sediment control devices; 4. Identify proper installation practices of both erosion and sediment control applications; 5. Select the appropriate BMP for various sediment and erosion control challenges; 6. Perform routine inspections of installed BMP’s; and 7. Apply appropriate corrective measures to maintain BMPs. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Introductions 

Module 2- Overview (Why we do it) 

Module 3- Erosion and Sediment Fundamentals  

Module 4- Erosion Control Practices  

Module 5- Sediment Control Practices 

Module 6- Developing an Erosion and Sediment Control Plan 

Module 7- SWPPP 

 

Who Should Take this Class: 

Any maintenance team member who may be responsible for installation and maintenance or inspection of erosion and sediment control measures should attend this class. 

This 3.5-hour class provides students basic pavement preservation concepts. The training will guide and assist maintenance personnel in making better and more informed decisions in selecting and applying various maintenance treatments. Materials, micro surfacing, slurry seals, and seal coats will be reviewed.  Students will also learn techniques for applying and compacting Ultra-Thin Friction Course. Students will gain overall knowledge on a full range of preventive maintenance techniques and strategies to preserve their roads.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing the Pavement Preservation Strategies course students will be able to: 1. Describe the treatment selection process; 2. List factors that might enter the selection process; 3. Identify the components and value of a Pavement Preventive Maintenance; 4. Describe and identify pavement deficiencies; 5. Identify various pavement preservation strategies, techniques and materials; 6. Describe pavement conditions and review scenarios to determine whether preventive maintenance is appropriate; and 7. Define the performance characteristics of different strategies, techniques and materials. 

 

Agenda 

Module 1: Pavement Preventive Maintenance Philosophy 

Module 2: Preventive Maintenance Distress Identification 

Module 3: Micro-Surfacing 

Module 4: Ultra-Thin Friction Course 

Module 5: Slurry Seal 

Module 6: Liquid Bituminous Seal Coat 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

Maintenance team members who may now or in the future work on pavement preservation projects should attend this class.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. In this 3.5-hour Pipe Installation and Maintenance class we will review the proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe.  Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options.  Students will discuss effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.  This interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, group exercises and case studies.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance students should be able to: 1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options; 2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices; 3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe; 4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices; 5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology; 7. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques; 8. Explain the importance of proper bedding; and 9. Describe proper maintenance techniques. 

  

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Pipe and Culvert Basics 

Module 3: Trench Fundamentals 

Module 4: Installation Procedures 

Module 5: Culvert Maintenance 

 

Who will benefit from the training? 

Members of a roadway/bridge crews, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training. 

In this 3.5-hour Roadside Maintenance class participants will gain the fundamentals of roadside maintenance.  Class topics include the importance of vegetation management, types of roadside slopes, ditch hazards, objects in clear zones, how to select roadside barrier systems, and best practices for properly maintaining your roadsides. Students will learn how to identify safety concerns when maintaining roadside signage.  This interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this course students will be able to: 1. Define roadside basic terminology;       2. Explain a clear zone and the importance of removing hazards in these zones; 3. Describe types of roadside slopes; 4. Describe the safety edge; 5. Identify importance of break-away sign posts; 6. Select appropriate roadside barrier systems; and 7. Identify best practices for vegetation management.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Roadside Design Guide 

Module 3: Pavement Drop Off 

Module 4: Objects In The Clear Zone 

Module 5: Roadside Barrier Systems 

Module 6: Roadside Maintenance 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for road supervisors and maintenance level personnel in rural areas and small communities who have responsibility for the operation and management of local roads. 

Unpaved roads released approximately 11 million tons of particulate matter into the atmosphere in the United States in 2014 (EPA). This 3.5-hour Stabilization and Dust Abatement class provides attendees with an overview of dust control requirements and current strategies for preventing, mitigating and controlling dust on roads.  Students will learn the effects that vegetation removal, wind and mechanical movement of soil have on roads. Students will gain a general understanding of soil modification methods for improving construction operations and the characteristics, advantages and limitations of soil stabilization methods. This interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class students will be able to: 1. Explain the effects of erosion on unpaved roads; 2. Describe situations when soil stabilization will be effective in improving the quality of the soil; 3. Describe the impact of fugitive dust; 4. Identify soil issues; 5. Apply appropriate control measures; and 6. Explain how to preserve fines with dust suppressants 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Why Dust Control 

Module 2- Managing your dust 

Module 3- Stabilization (Full Depth Reclamation) 

Module 4- When you’re starting from scratch 

Module 5- Public Perception 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

Any maintenance team members that work on gravel roads and deal with the dust issues inherent to their maintenance should take this class.   

  • Maintenance
  • Group exercise

How to Conduct a Car Seat Checkpoint training module is a 3.5 hour class that provides a basic introduction on how to conduct a car seat checkpoint. Students will gain practical knowledge through presentation and class discussion related to event and program planning, CPS roles and goals, event marketing and partnership building.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing How to Conduct a Car Seat Checkpoint, participants should be able to: 1. List necessary steps to conduct a car seat checkpoint; 2. List resources necessary to conduct a car seat checkpoint; and 3. Effectively plan a car seat checkpoint.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Primary roles and goals of CPS Technicians and car seat checkpoints 

Module 2: Event planning 

Module 3: Site selection 

Module 4: Staffing 

Module 5: Event set up 

Module 6: Event operations 

Module 7: Liability 

Module 8: Promotion 

Module 9: Event follow-up 

Module 10: Resources for CPS technicians and Injury Prevention Coordinators 

The Basic Child Passenger Safety Awareness Course training is a 1-day training course that provides a basic introduction to Child Passenger Safety (CPS) in Indian Country; SNAP. Students will gain practical experience through a variety of presentations and hands-on exercises related to vehicle seat belt systems, various types of child restraints (car seats), and the misuse of child restraints. The Basic Child Passenger Safety Awareness Course does not offer certification and does not replace or serve as a substitute for the 32-hour National Standardized Child Passenger Safety Technician Training Program course offered by Safe Kids Worldwide. Participants who complete SNAP will be eligible to receive professional developments (PDs) from Indian Health Service.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing a basic child passenger safety awareness course, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the disparity of motor vehicle crash injuries among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children. 2. Describe best practices for properly restraining children of all ages, and how they differ from state and Tribal laws. 3. Demonstrate how vehicle seat belt systems and LATCH are used to secure child restraints in vehicles. 4. Describe the different components of child restraints and their function. 5. Select the proper child restraint based on the age, height, and weight, of a child. 6. Recognize and correct the misuse of child restraints. 7. Properly educate parents and caregivers on the correct selection and use of child restraints  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction to CPS 

Module 2: What Happens in a Crash?  

Module 3: Locking in a Car Seat 

Module 4: Child Restraint Basics 

Module 5: Rear-Facing Car Seats 

Module 6: Forward-Facing Car Seats 

Module 7: Seat Selection Skills Test 

Module 8: Misuse Identification Skills Test  

The Strategies to Increase Restraint Use is a full day class that provides certified National Child Passenger Safety Technicians and Instructors new strategies to increase seat belts and child safety seat restrain use.   Learn new technology and strategies to change outcomes in your community.  Child Passenger Safety Recertification seat sign off will be available for all technician needing to recertify.  Keep certified technicians current and up to date is a great strategy to increase restraint use.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Strategies to Increase Restraint Use, participants should be able to: 1. Learn strategies to maintain technician certification; 2. Provide the participant with current resources for child passenger safety; 3. Learn new technology that support restraint usage; 4. Review overall child passenger safety strategies; and 5. Demonstrate current child restraint installation skills for recertification requirements.  

 

Agenda:  

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Obtaining a Student Manual 

Module 3: Latchplates and Retractors 

Module 4: Low anchors and Tethers 

Module 5: Side Impact Features in Vehicles 

Module 6: Airbags 

Module 7: New Technology 

Module 8: New Car Seats 

Module 9: Recertification Child Seat Sign Offs 

 

Contract Cost and Negotiation looks at a case study of the most expensive mile of subway track on earth.  This review covers nine interesting reasons of how NOT to build a project. This 3.5-hour class is designed to enable learners on ways to begin thinking critically about how to look at contracting challenges for better transportation project planning and design; early and continuous innovations; right-of-way phasing; real-time pricing and accelerated design that may require additional cultural and educational shifts. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Contract Specification Writing, participants should be able to; 1.  Recognize alternative contracting approaches; 2.  Understand best practice for selection of contracting methods; and 3.  Define preconstruction services and preparation of proposals. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  The Discovery 

Module 3:  Smart Contracting 

Module 4:  Selection Process 

Module 5:  Preconstruction 

Module 6:  Proposal 

Module 7:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with the selection of contracting methods for transportation projects, preconstruction services, and proposal preparation

 

Contract Execution provides the “Who”, “What”, and “Why” of a transportation project contract while defining the responsibilities and obligations of the Tribe and the contractor. This 3.5-hour class is designed to enable the learner to define the rights of the Tribe and the Contractor with respect to ownership of the project and obligations of each upon termination of the development activities.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Contract Specification Writing, participants should be able to: 1.  Describe the various segments of contract responsibilities.  2.  Explain project development and allowable costs.  3.  Discuss alternative contracting methods. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Your Contract Basics 

Module 3:  Responsibilities 

Module 4:  Development Activities 

Module 5:  Contracting Methods 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for anyone involved with writing/reviewing contracts for transportation projects and working with contractors during the development activities of a transportation project. 

Contract Specification Writing consists of careful consistency of requirements throughout a contract and conformity with what is written in other documents.  This 3.5-hour class is designed to enable the student to understand Specification Documentation, Writing, and Language using individual practical application that includes writing “specifications” for brewing coffee.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Contract Specification Writing, participants should be able to: 1.  Explain the elements of plans/specifications/estimates and FP-14.  2.  Understand the different forms of specifications on roadway construction.  3.  Explain the Tribe’s involvement in specification review/approval.  4.  Describe the different initiatives that have helped advance specification quality/consistency. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Plans/Specifications/Estimates 

Module 2:  Specification’s Role 

Module 3:  Different Forms of Specifications 

Module 4:  Different Types of Specifications 

Module 5:  Best Practices FHWA Specification Development 

Module 6:  Division Office Participation after Review/Approval 

Module 7:  Specification Effectiveness 

Module 8: Course Wrap-up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for anyone involved with communicating with bidders prior to contract award; managing a transportation project; or administering a transportation project. 

The Cost Estimating training is a 3.5-hour class that begins with the initial introduction to Estimating Basics for Tribal transportation projects. Class discussion will include how an “estimate” differs from a “bid”.  The transportation project delivery process will define the different types of “estimating”, types of project delivery, and the compilation of how to achieve the best “bang-for-your-buck”.  An electronic calculation spreadsheet will be shared along with practical application on how to calculate cost-per-unit or lump sum transportation project materials.  A hands-on exercise will determine how to best estimate the cost of constructing one mile of roadway. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Cost Estimating, participants should be able to: 1. Describe “Best Practices” for a successful Tribal transportation project delivery process.  2.  Use “planning level” estimates beginning with ball-park figures.  3.  Relate the importance of including construction and preliminary engineering costs.  4.  Explain the importance for accurate project documentation. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Estimating Basics 

Module 3:  Project Delivery Process 

Module 4:  Planning Level Estimate 

Module 5:  Next Step 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Course: 

This class provides entry level cost estimating training that is intended for individuals becoming involved in the planning, management and operations of Tribal Transportation projects.  

Data Use in Planning addresses transportation planning challenges; how emerging transportation data, technologies and application can be integrated with existing systems; and how advanced data and intelligent transportation systems (ITS) can be used to reduce congestion, keep travelers safe, protect the environment, and support economic vitality.  In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive insight into current transportation data technology and how it is revolutionizing transportation safety and mobility while reducing costs and environmental impacts.  A student Transportation History Trivia competition will provide a fun perspective of how transportation has evolved and how rapidly transportation is progressing. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Data Use in Planning, participants should be able to; 1. Explain the challenges of transportation delivery and logistics; 2. Communicate the link between Data Use and Safety; 3. Describe how Data Use helps relieve congestion; and 4.  Explain the link between Data Use and the Environment. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Transportation and Data Use 

Module 3:  Data Use and Safety 

Module 4:  Data Use and Congestion 

Module 5:  Data Use and the Environment 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for anyone involved with transportation that wants to learn more about the identifying areas where advanced technologies can be integrated into the aspects of the community and how data plays a critical role in helping their communities address challenges in safety, mobility, sustainability, economic vitality and climate change. 

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging, especially for low funded Tribes.   In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years.  The hands-on activity will include group participation to complete an online FHWA TTIP Template. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to: 1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal and state planning to leverage funding.  2. Describe the process of identifying the Gap between the Tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists. 3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Your Transportation Improvement Plan 

Module 3:  What is in My TTIP? 

Module 4:  How Do I Use the TTIP Template? 

Module 5:  The Next Steps of TTIP 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders; Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

 

Evaluation and Selection of Consultants is the process by which a tribe must decide on the service need; how broad of a list of consultants to have for initial consideration; how to develop the proposal; which selection process to use; what criteria to use; and who will be involved in the selection. In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on the basic process of selecting a consultant and/or contractor.  Students will complete this class by reviewing a set of engineer firms (AE Firms) submittals to an agency’s Request for Proposals/Qualifications.  After reviewing students will determine the most qualified proposals based upon criteria established.  The student will walk away with the knowledge of how to better select a consultant based upon qualifications. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Evaluation and Selection of Consultants, participants should be able to; 1. Develop a written process to evaluate and select consultants/contractors; 2. Create a process to attract consultants/contractors; and 3. Explain the importance of consistency. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Scope of Work 

Module 3:  The Selection Process 

Module 4:  The Process Continues 

Module 5:  Course Wrap-Up/Group Exercise 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the selection process for consultants and/or contractors, and ways to successfully promote full and open competition while fostering innovation and creativity. 

Financial Planning for Tribal Transportation training is a 3.5-hour class that provides a basic introduction to Financial Planning and Identifying “Needs and Priorities”. Students will begin by identifying community priorities and then identify possible funding streams from the “Funding Projects and Types” handout.  Each “available funding source” will be discussed in detail.   

Students will be provided practical steps on beginning a Tribal Transportation Plan.  Direction will also be provided on what to do after the Tribal Transportation Plan has been developed. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Financial Planning for Tribal Transportation, participants should be able to: 1. Identify and prioritize Tribal transportation needs.  2.  Describe various funding streams for identified transportation projects.  3.  Be able to begin the development of a Financial Tribal Transportation Plan with a worksheet in hand. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Financial Planning Steps 

Module 3:  Starting Financial Planning 

Module 4:  Putting the Steps Together 

Module 5:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

 Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Transportation planners, Council members, Finance officers, Project managers and anyone involved with planning and administering Tribal Transportation projects.  This training will also provide valuable insight to an individual from the community that wishes to better understand the financial planning for Tribal transportation projects. 

Long Range Transportation Planning (LRTP) is a cooperative, coordinated, communication-driven process by which long and short-range transportation improvement priorities are determined which impact the Environment, the Economy, Land Use, Social Equality and Safety.  In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on the basic components of the LRTP which include the plans, programs and process.  A fun “LRTP Jeopardy” competition will challenge the participants knowledge of commonly used acronyms and abbreviations, some tribal history, and general knowledge about the planning process. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Long Range Transportation Planning, participants should be able to: 1. Understand importance of the “3 C’s”, Continuing, Cooperative, and Comprehensive.   2. Become familiar with how projects are selected and how funds are distributed. 3. Understand the benefits and key products of the LRTP. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  What Is Long Range Transportation Planning 

Module 3:  The Benefits of Transportation Planning 

Module 4:  The Transportation Planning Process 

Module 5:  Tribal Sovereignty & Transportation Planning 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the process of developing strategies for constructing, operating and financing transportation facilities to achieve the community’s long-term transportation goals. 

Procurement 101 is a 3.5-hour class that begins with a Case-study of the largest political corruption case in FBI history.  Procurement standards are illustrated on the “CLAW” of the bear.  Hands-on student activities will provide a humorous view of 2 CFR Cost Principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments.    

   

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed. The Instructor will guide the students through an actual “on-line” demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the consequences of not following State, Local and Tribal governments procurement standards.  2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.  3. Recognize the importance of awareness to guidelines as set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles  and Super circular handout. 4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.  

 

The course content includes: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  The “Birds” and the FBI 

Module 3:  The Bear “CLAW” of procurement standards 

Module 4:  The “Bees” of procurement requirements 

Module 5:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Financial Officers, Project Managers and anyone involved with administration and procurement for Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of procurement requirements for federal funding

Procurement Process is a 3.5-hour class that continues and builds on concepts from Procurement 101 to develop a complete understanding of the definition of Procurement and the process involved.   Simplified steps of the procurement process will be demonstrated through the act of ordering a pizza.  Types of procurement will be reviewed, and the roles defined in a Procurement Office/Division.   

The 7 R’s of Procurement will provide direction in making purchases in a manner that provides and promotes full and open competition.  Procurement methods will include a detailed discussion of “simplified acquisition”, “formal procurement”, and “competitive procurement”.    

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Procurement Process, participants should be able to: 1. Understand applicable laws for procurement.  2. Explain the roles of individuals within the Procurement Office/Division.  3. Recognize the different types of procurement methods, assess the need for a Procurement plan and understand various procurement policies. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Procurement Procedures 

Module 3:  Procurement Methods 

Module 4:  Procurement Plan 

Module 5:  Procurement Policies 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Planners, Financial Officers, Project Managers and anyone involved with the procurement process.  This training also provides insight to any individual that works with the procurement process and federal funding requirements. 

Project Prioritization strengthens the Tribes ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs.  In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on the basic steps of Project Prioritization and practical application of techniques for performing tasks.  The formal prioritizing of transportation projects heightens opportunities for funding and partnership.  Hands-on activities will include the development of a Project Data Book and a Project Summary Spreadsheet.    

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Project Prioritization, students should be able to: 1. Identify projects and develop project criteria and evaluation measures.  2.  Report findings and seek public input for consensus.  3.  Finalize prioritized projects and insert them into the Tribal Priority List, the Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, or both. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  What is Project Prioritization? 

Module 3:  How do I Prioritize Transportation Projects? 

Module 4:  What do I need in a Project Prioritization Toolbox? 

Module 5:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of how prioritizing projects strengthens the Tribe’s ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs.   

The Public Involvement is a 3.5-hour class that provides a basic overview to the legal requirements of public involvement in the tribal transportation process. Students will begin with details of public involvement methods and techniques.  Discovering the necessity of public involvement will entail a fun hands-on activity that highlights the importance of communication.  Overcoming challenges of engaging low-income communities and possibly community members with physical limitations will be open for classroom discussion.  

Strategies to continue the public involvement process will be offered through discussion of recent case-studies.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Public Involvement, participants should be able to: 1. Explain the law that gives the public the opportunity to comment and provide input to Tribal transportation projects. 2. Communicate Public Involvement phases from the planning phase and throughout the life of the project.  3.  Appreciate the level of public involvement and how we commensurate with the scope and intensity of the project. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction​ 

Module 2:  Guiding Principles​ 

Module 3:  Strategies​ 

Module 4:  Continuing Public Involvement​ 

Module 5:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Financial Officers, Project Managers, Tribal Contractors/Consultants and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of public involvement requirements for federal funding.   

 

The Single Audit 3.5-hour class provides direction on how to best prepare for an audit and when single audits are required for tribal transportation projects.  Handouts from an actual federal project will provide guidance for how to set up files to best accommodate the eventuality of an audit and standards for determining if costs are allowable for federal funding.  An additional review of 2 CFR Part 200 and the “Circulars” superseded by the Uniform Guidance will be a classroom discussion.   

Examples of single audit findings will provide guidance for audit best practices.  Responsibilities for management of federal funding will be discussed in detail. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Single Audit, participants should be able to: 1. Understand how to prepare for a successful tribal transportation project Single Audit.  2.  Use the “SMART” Corrective Action Plan guideline to successfully resolve any single audit findings.  3.  Know where to find resources to assist with successful single audit requirements.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction​ 

Module 2:  The Single Audit Act​ 

Module 3:  Audit Requirements​ 

Module 4:  Auditee Responsibilities​ 

Module 5:  Federal Agency Responsibilities​ 

Module 6:  Audit Reporting​ 

Module 7:  Audit Best Practices​ 

Module 8:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Financial Officers, Project Managers and anyone involved with administration of Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of audit requirements for federal funding. 

The attendees of this 3.5-hour class will gain a basic understanding of the data/evidence-driven process and its role in the development of a Tribal Safety Plan.  The data/evidence-driven decision process used with a Safety Plan requires an organization to understand the process of analyzing both road segment and intersectional Crash Data. It also requires an organization to identify possible problems and trends within the data.  It is these trends and causes that are used to review the root causes and contributing factors that lead to crashes.  This class will enable students the ability use data to establish a “Hot Spot” or a “Systemic” analysis process.  Students will also learn effective corrective actions that reduce the threat of additional crashes.  This type of Data Analysis enables organizations to incorporate it into the organizational Safety Plan and provides the evidence that supports safety project funding and development.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Crash Data Analysis, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the importance of using good data to support a Tribal Safety Plan; 2. Identify Sources for crash data on Tribal Lands; 3. Analyze Crash Data for both Hot Spot and Systemic Approaches to Safety Plans; and 4. Properly review a sample of a basic crash map. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Crash Data Sources and Formats 

Module 2: Understanding the need to standardize formats and share crash reports 

Module 3: Safety Data Analysis 

Module 4: What Data is Needed/Contributing Factors 

Module 5: Data Screening  

Module 6: Network Screening 

Module 7: Systematic Safety Approach 

 

Who should take this class: 

This training is designed for tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads.

Improving Safety at Intersections is a 3.5-hour class.  Intersection crashes can be significantly reduced in Tribal lands by the application of proven safety measures for rural and urban intersections.   This class presents examples of intersection safety countermeasures for design, operations, and low-cost safety improvements.   Examples are presented along with their specific safety benefits in the form of crash reduction factors.  Topics covered include: seven characteristics of a safe intersection, different types of intersections used to manage traffic, common geometric problems that could be a safety risk and how to fix them, how to use signage for intersections, and how to maintain sight triangles.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to: 1. Describe the cost in lives for crashes at intersections. 2. Identify seven characteristics that make an intersection safe. 3. Describe the types of traffic control used to manage different volumes of vehicles through intersections. 4. Understand the features that describe the geometry of an intersection and how they influence motorists. 5. Identify common geometric problems that could create a safety risk and how to fix them. 6. Understand how to use signs correctly to improve safety at intersections. 7. List different types of countermeasures to improve intersection safety and how to how to implement them. 8. Describe the importance of sight triangles and how to calculate them. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Intersection Tribal Crash Data – The Why 

Module 2: The Evolution of an Intersection 

Module 3: Flaws in Your Intersection 

Module 4: Signs -- Do it Right or Pay the Price 

Module 5: Low Cost Safety Countermeasures 

Module 6: Sight Distance 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public at intersections.  Attendees will gain the knowledge of how to make intersections safer, reducing injuries and fatalities. 

In Indian Country, the most common type of crash is the run-off-the-road crash. The impact on the vehicle when it leaves the road determines the survivability of that crash. Railroad grade crossings represent another common crash location for tribal families. This 3.5-hour class identifies some of the hazards that are built, planted or placed in the Right of Way that can increase the severity of crashes. It will also explore some of the common problems with railroad crossings and will identify the safety features of those crossings. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing this class participants should be able to; 1. Identify the hazards that are located within the clear zone; 2. Use the intersection sight triangle to identify present and future sight issues at intersections and driveways; 3. Review an unprotected R/R grade crossing and identify the missing signs and markings; and 4. Discuss the role and the usage of a Safety Compliance Office. 

 

Agenda 

Module 1: Elements of a run off the road type of crash 

Module 2: What is the Clearzone as defined by the Roadside Design Guide? 

Module 3: How can we protect the tribal members? 

Module 4: What is the Sight Triangle of intersections and obstructions 

Module 5: R/R Grade Crossings  

Module 6: What other agencies do to protect their community 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide best practices for creating safer roads through proper management of right-of-way for managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to manage roadway right-of-way, gaining knowledge on ways to take a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads. 

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) is a 3.5-hour class condensed from Road Safety 365.  It is designed to provide Tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions into their day-to-day activities, reducing collisions, injuries, and fatalities.  If you’ve ever wondered if your work makes a difference, this class will show you how important roadway work truly is.  Topics discussed include: The need for making roads safer, Road safety myths vs. realities, How to “read the road” and improve safety in your community, and Practical and proven low cost countermeasures for safety.  Attendees will leave the workshop with a renewed spirit and the ability to make an impact for their community.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to: 1. Explain the need for making roads safer. 2. Separate safety myths from reality. 3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues. 4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects. 5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction to Low Cost Safety 

Module 2: The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data 

Module 3: Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality 

Module 4: Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community 

Module 5: Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies 

Module 6: Course Wrap Up 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. 

Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road.  Attendees will gain the knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities

Road Safety Audits (RSA) is a 3.5-hour class in which studnets will learn how to improve transportation safety by applying a proactive approach to reduce collisions and their severity in tribal lands. These techniques provide an examination of a roadway by an independent, qualified audit team. The RSA is a way for an agency to improve roadway safety, reduce injuries and fatalities, and to communicate to the public how they are working toward these goals. This course includes topics such as: RSA definition and history, how to conduct a RSA, and identifying the common safety issues found with RSA’s.  Participants will leave the workshop with a working knowledge on how to perform a road safety audit. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Road Safety Audits, participants should be able to: 1. Define why we need Road Safety Audits 2. Describe the process for completing a Road Safety Audit 3. Describe Risk and Safety 4. Recognize common issues found while conducting RSA’s 5. Demonstrate how to perform a RSA through examples. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction and Basic Concepts of Roadway Safety 

Module 2: Steps to Performing a Road Safety Audit 

Module 3: Understanding Risk and Safety 

Module 4: Examples of Safety Issues and Countermeasures 

Module 5: Case Studies of Tribal RSA’s 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide road safety audit training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to perform a road safety audit.  Attendees will gain knowledge of a process on how to take a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads. 

Roundabouts are a proven safety solution for reducing the frequency and severity of intersection crashes and are seeing increasing use in tribal lands.  This 3.5 hour class presents an introduction to the basics of roundabout geometry, the safety and other benefits of roundabouts, how to overcome opposition, and basic design elements of roundabouts.  Participants will leave with a working knowledge of how roundabouts operate and why they are beneficial. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this Roundabouts class, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the features of a roundabout 2. Understand the operational rules of roundabouts that make them more efficient than cross intersections 3. Describe the safety benefits of roundabouts and why they work 4.  

Understand characteristics of an intersection that indicate whether or not a roundabout would be a good solution. 5. Understand common arguments used to oppose roundabouts 6. Identify crash reduction from installations 7. Describe how to set up temporary traffic control for roundabouts. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introductions 

Module 2: Roundabout Basics and Benefits 

Module 3: Safety Aspects of Roundabouts 

Module 4: Roundabout Opposition 

Module 5: Tribal Examples and Case Studies  

Module 6: Roundabout Temporary Traffic Control 

Module 7: Course Wrap Up 

 

Who should take this course: 

This class has been developed to provide information on roundabouts to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how roundabouts work and the potential safety benefits associated with their use

This 3.5-hour class will review effective pedestrian safety projects, address the need for non-data-based reviews and identify methods for addressing the needs of the tribal pedestrians and bicyclist. 

Eleven percent of all crashes that occur on tribal lands are pedestrian related.  The primary mode of transportation for a number of tribes is pedestrian and bicycle.  Therefore, a safe transportation system must address the needs of the multi-modal transportation system.  A traditional data analysis of crash data reports does not generally show the full picture of the concerns of this traveling population.  This class will review several safety projects that have been funded, address the need for non-data based reviews and identify methods for addressing not only the needs of the tribal pedestrians but also the bicyclist. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP), students should be able to:  1. Describe the importance of using good data to support a Tribal Multi-Modal Transportation Project; 2. Identify Sources of funding for Multi-modal Projects and Upgrades; 3. Analyze Crash Data for both Hot Spot and Systemic Approaches to Safety Plans; and 4. Review the current Multi-Modal Transportation System to insure that all of the low cost safety devices meet or exceed the minimum standards.​ 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Multi-Modal Plan and Safe Routes to School 

Module 2: Issues for persons on foot or using bicycles 

Module 3: How can a Multi-Modal Plan reduce Fatalities 

Module 4: How a Multi-Modal Plan, Safe Routes to School and Safety Plans Interact 

Module 5: What Data is Needed 

Module 6: Data Screening 

Module 7: Systematic Multi-Modal Approach 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was designed for tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads

The goal of this 3.5-hour class is to assist tribal agencies as they are developing a Tribal Safety Plan in gathering and reviewing the data that is needed when developing or updating those plans.  As a Safety Plan is being developed assumptions as to the concerns and the issues may be made, while these concerns are based on experience and are very real, not all of the solutions may be apparent.  This class will assist the individuals in gathering the whole picture of the issues, enabling them to develop a Data and Evidence Driven Decision Making Process as they develop or update their Safety Plan.    

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing the Safety Data class, participants should be able to; 1. Be able to identify which data set may be required for their Safety Plan; 2. What are the four Es of Safety; 3. How to develop a Data and Evidence driven decision making process; and 4. What data and partnerships need to be formed when developing a Safety Plan? 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Data and Evidence Driven Decisions 

Module 2: The four Es of Safety 

Module 3: Roadway Data 

Module 4: Crash Data 

Module 5: Pedestrian Data 

 

Who should take this class: 

This training is designed for Tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads

The goal of this 3.5- hour class is to assist tribal agencies in the development of a safety plan as well as improvement of existing safety plans. Indian Country Transportation Systems are managed by many Tribal, Federal, State and Local Agencies involved in providing a Safe and Efficient Transportation System to keep up with tribal growth and development.  This management has led to concerns by the tribes when reviewing the crash, fatal, and injuries rates within these tribal organizations.  To enable tribal areas access to Federal, State and Local funds that have been provided to assist with the tribal transportation systems, a Data/Evidence-driven decision process, a Tribal Transportation Safety Plan, needs to be developed.  This class will explore the resources provided by the Federal Highway Administration/ Lands to assist each of the tribal areas in the development of these plans, as well as exploring the data files provided by the National Transportation Highway Safety Administration for tribal lands.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Safety Plan Development, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the importance of developing a Transportation Safety Plan; 2. Explain the four E’s of Safety; 3. Describe how to develop a data and evidence-driven decision-making process; and 4. Identify the data and partnerships needed in the development of Safety Plans.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Why Elected Officials/Council need to be involved in safety planning 

Module 2: What is needed to get started 

Module 3: What resources can assist 

Module 4: How does a Safety Plan improve the transportation around my home 

 

Who should take this class: 

This training is designed for Tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads. 

 

As a tribal government reviews the intersections in the tribal road system, one of the types of intersections that are used is the signalized intersections.  This type of intersection in most cases is owned and managed by the State or Federal organizations that manage the roadways that pass through the tribal lands.  Because of this relationship, the roadway manager needs to be included in the discussions with the tribal leadership.  Due to the cost and impacts of a Signalized Intersection on the transportation system the FHWA Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) provides some strict guidance when looking at installing this type of intersectional control.  This 3.5-hour class will review those controls (Warrants) in the MUTCD, at a depth that provides a basic understanding, as well as reviewing low-cost safety improvements that can enhance the operation of an existing signalized intersections.     

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Safety Improvements for Signalized Intersection course, the participants should be able to; 1. Identify which intersections may require additional review for a possible Signalized Intersection; 2. Gain an understanding of the Warrants used to identify intersections being proposed as a signalized intersection; 3. Review a number of the low-cost safety improvements that can be used with Signalized intersections; and 4. Introduce some of the innovative intersection designs that can be used with or without signalization  to enhance the intersection.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Understanding the effect of signalization on intersection safety 

Module 2: Understanding the eight Warrants outlined in the MUTCD for signalized intersections 

Module 3: Low cost safety features that can be used on signalized intersections 

Module 4: Innovative intersection design for signalized and non-signalized intersections. 

 

Who should take this class: 

This training was designed for Tribal transportation designers and planners.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads

In any organization, the most valued part of that organization is its employees. The only way to protect your tribal members is to identify the hazards that they work with and then mitigate those hazards. This 3.5-hour class will demonstrate the key features in developing a risk assessment and an Employees Safety program to protect those employees.   Key injury and fatality areas in both Administration and Enterprise work areas will be identified. Resources for the training and education of the workforce will also be reviewed. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing the Worker Safety class, participants will be able to; 1. Identify the hazards and risks involved in their daily work tasks; 2. Describe the five methods used to protect an employee; 3. Understand the importance of developing and managing an Employee Safety Plan; 4. Demonstrate the tools available to the organization when planning for your employee’s safety.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Key safety concerns for most organizations 

Module 2: High risk type of work. 

Module 3: Five key elements in protecting an Employee. 

Module 4: Workshop on using the five key elements to Safety 

Module 5: Example of Safety Concerns 

Module 6: Resources available. 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, office staff, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the dangers found on the job site and in the workplace.  Attendees will begin to think about safety every day on every job, reducing the risk of serious injury or death. 

Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (DTTIP) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session. It is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging. Students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years. Coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding will be discussed. The process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists will be reviewed. Students will become familiar with ways to use the FHWA TTIP template and reshape to create their own TTIP.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to:
1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding.
2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists.
3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template.

Agenda:

• Your Transportation Improvement Plan
• What is in My TTIP?
• How Do I Use the TTIP Template?
• The Next Steps of TTIP

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders; tribal planners and anyone involved with tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

LCSI is designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions to reduce collisions, injuries, and fatalities. Students will learn how to ‘read the road’ and identify roadway safety issues. A review of practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road construction, will be provided.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the need for making roads safer.
2. Separate safety myths from reality.
3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues.
4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects.
5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise.

Agenda:

• Introduction to Low Cost Safety
• The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data
• Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality
• Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community
• Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies

Who should take this course:

This class has been developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road. Students will gain knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

This two hour asynchronous online Pipe Installation and Maintenance (PIM) class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. The proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe will be reviewed. Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options and learn effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance, students should be able to:
1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options;
2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices;
3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe;
4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices;
5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology;
6. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques;
7. Explain the importance of proper bedding;
8. Describe proper maintenance techniques.

Agenda:

• Pipe and Culvert Basics
• Trench Fundamentals
• Installation Procedures
• Culvert Maintenance

Who will benefit from the training?

Members of a roadway/bridge crew, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Procurement 101 (P101) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session that is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed as well as a demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile. Students will become familiar with the five procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”. Students will also gain understanding of the guidelines set forth in the 2 C.F.R. Cost Principles and Super Circular handout.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to:
1. Understand the consequences of not following state, local and tribal governments procurement standards.
2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.
3. Recognize the importance of awareness to guidelines as set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super circular handout.
4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.

Agenda:

• The “Birds” and the FBI
• The Bear “CLAW” of procurement standards
• The “Bees” of procurement requirements

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders, financial officers, project managers and anyone involved with administration and procurement for tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the importance of procurement requirements for federal funding.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu