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Class Schedule - Alaska - Bethel, AK

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Excessive construction periods due to project inefficiencies can frustrate drivers and can extend the possibility of additional hazards driving through work zones. Two of the primary constraints of a project are the schedule and the cost. The focus of this 3.5-hour class will help participants gain information about the importance of scheduling and budgeting a project. Participants will learn techniques to set plan schedules and budgets with key stakeholders.  Learners will understand the importance of monitoring and controlling the project performance and why it is imperative to provide continual schedule and budget updates.

 

Learning outcomes:

After successful completion, Project Management students should be able to: 1. Use various tools to make cost and schedule decisions and establish baselines; 2. Apply various techniques to develop effective project cost estimates; 3. Interpret and analyze cost and schedule performance; and 4. Identify and manage cost and schedule changes.

 

The course content includes: 

  • Project cost management
  • Cost estimating terms and concepts
  • Units of project time
  • Project cost estimating techniques
  • Time management
  • Key scheduling terms and concepts
  • Benefits of accurate schedules and the downfalls that can impact them
  • Monitoring cost and schedule performance
  • Recognize key activities for cost and schedule control

Various federal programs support tribal governments in times of natural disaster. Funds to restore travel, minimize damage and protect the remaining facilities are available for emergency and permanent repairs to roads and highways. This 3.5-hour class will review options related to submitting, adopting, implementing and funding relief projects. A variety of federal resources will be reviewed including the FHWA’s Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) program and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) tribal resources including Emergency Preparedness grants. The class will address damage assessment, damage survey report checklists and field measurements. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to; 1. Identify disaster relief programs and their authorization; 2. Identify Emergency Relief, Emergency Relief Federally Owned program intent, funding sources, and key policies; 3. Describe disaster assessment and approval; 4. Learn assessment and approval responsibilities; 5. Learn emergency repair definition and timeline; 6. Explain permanent repairs and approvals; 7. Describe steps of the EFRO program administration process; 8. Understand which of your agency’s transportation facilities will be approved for funding; 9. Use eligibility statements to discuss if damage is eligible; 10. Explain how to safely collect field data; 11. Complete an acceptable damage survey report; and 12. Prepare for closeout. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Emergency Relief Programs OverviewModule 7- Eligible Damage and Repairs 

Module 2- Disaster Assessment and ApprovalModule 8- Site Assessment 

Module 3- Emergency RepairsModule 9- Damage Survey Repairs 

Module 4- Permanent RepairsModule 10- Repair Approval 

Module 5- Program AdministrationModule 11- Betterments 

Module 6- Eligible FacilitiesModule 12- Closeout 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for area engineers, maintenance leaders, contract specialists and administrators, maintenance supervisors/leaders, those who work in emergency repair projects, and those wanting to learn more about the emergency relief program.

Meeting the environmental requirements to begin a transportation project demands a knowledge of the needed permits and processes. Individuals responsible for meeting these tasks prior to the construction must have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to document the process and needed permits so projects can meet letting and schedules. In this 3.5-hour class students will gain knowledge of the environmental permits in relation to the NEPA process needed to begin a project and bring it to construction. Students will also become familiar with the language and necessary elements to produce quality environmental documents for a successful outcome.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Environmental Permits, Certificates, and Licenses, students should be able to; 1. Identify the various permits and certifications in the environmental process; 2. Demonstrate when to apply for the various permits in relation to transportation projects; 3. Identify the process used to fill out necessary documents; and 4. Define the necessary steps to ensure successful documentation.  

 

Agenda: 

Module1: Permits and Acts 

Module 2: NPDES Phase II 

Module 3: Section 404 Permits 

Module 4: Section 401 permits 

Module 5: Wildlife and Habitat Approvals 

Module 6: Air Quality Standards 

Module 7: Historic Permits 

Module 8: Stream and Wetland Permits 

Module 9: Local Ordinances 

Module 10: Honoring Commitments 

Module 11: Erosion Control Measures 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for project managers and developers.  This class is introductory, so it will also help prepare an individual who wants to enter the management field. 

Getting your project off the ground can sometimes be challenging when there are so many details involved.  In this 3.5-hour class students will learn the appropriate steps to take when starting a project.  We will review the basics of project management and how planning, organizing, controlling, and measuring a project is key to success.  Students will learn the project life cycle and how each phase of a project leads to the next. Learners will gain an understanding of the role of a project manager and how their leadership has a large impact on team and project success. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Getting Your Project Started students should be able to; 1. Construct a project roadmap; 2. Describe key elements of project management; 3. Define the project cycle; 4. Define and initiate a planning process; 5. Identify the role of the project manager; 6. Summarize the communication process and its critical role in project success; and 7. Select a project team and identify their roles. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Meetings 

Module 3: Planning Phase 

Module 4: Environmental Phase 

Module 5: Design Phase 

Module 6: Right of Way Phase 

Module 7: Construction Phase 

Module 8: Maintenance and Operation Phase 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for project managers, construction administrators, or anyone wanting to learn the step by phases of getting a project started. 

This 3.5-hour class addresses various right-of-way acquisition issues. Right-of-Way is crucial for project construction. Without the needed ROW it is impossible to complete any transportation project. Depending on the project, acquiring the needed ROW can be lengthy, costly, complicated. Understanding the ROW acquisition process can help planners structure their schedules allowing for a smooth transition from planning to actual construction. Utilizing the principles and requirements of the ROW process can also save money and avoid long delays in building a highway.   

  

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Procedures for Right-of-Way acquisition, students should be able to; 1. Understand the Uniform Act for relocation assistance; ; 2. Understand the relationship between FHWA and tribal groups in the ROW acquisition process; 3. Identify the NEPA process and its importance prior to purchasing ROW; 4. Be familiar with the impacts to families and businesses when acquiring ROW; 5. Understand the valuation process; and 6. Identify the relocation payments and services process. 

 

Agenda:   

Module 1- Introduction to the Uniform Act and other federal laws 

Module 2- Product Delivery and Administrative Matters 

Module 3- Valuation and Appraisals 

Module 4- How does ROW work on tribal lands 

Module 5- Relocation Assistance 

Module 6- Property Management 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for right-of-way administrators, project managers, designers, maintenance supervisors, and those wanting to learn more about right-of-way acquisition.  

Successfully completing a project involves not only meeting the requirements of the contract and plans, it includes completion of the needed process to receive reimbursements. Individuals responsible for closing a project hold an important responsibility in ensuring the correct procedures and followed. Bad planning or not adhering the needed procedures can cause unnecessary delays for the project contractor or agency.  In this 3.5-hour class students will gain knowledge of the project closeout and completion standards.  Students will also become aware of the necessary documentation for a successful project closeout and completion. 

  

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Project Closeout and Completion, students should be able to;    1. Describe project closeout; 2. Explain the closeout process; 3. Describe common problems in closing projects;  4. Identify needed documentation; and 5. Share best practices.  

 

Agenda:   

Module 1- What is project closeout 

Module 2- Common closeout problems 

Module 3- Final Acceptance 

Module 4- Final Voucher 

Module 5- Closeout Memo 

Module 6- Comprehensive Project Closeout 

Module 7- Group Exercise 

Module 8- Best Practices 

Module 9- Project Closeout Tips 

Module 10- Improving Closeout 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for project managers, construction and maintenance inspectors, area engineers, record keepers, and anyone involved or interested in wanting to learn more about the project closeout process.

A comprehensive and established Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Program is essential to a successful outcome. A good QA/QC program begins in the early phases of the project from pre-planning to delivery of the final product. While construction inspectors are viewed as the key to a good construction project, all personnel involved in the all phases of the project are expected to provide quality work.  In this 3.5-hour class students will gain knowledge of the Quality Assurance/Quality Control Program in a manner that can be applied to all phases from the environmental process to actual construction. Students will also become familiar with the QA/QC process and its importance to a successful outcome.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Quality Assurance and Quality Control, students should be able to; 1. Understand the need for a good Quality Assurance program; 2. Identify the difference between the agency’s responsibility and the contractor’s responsibility in the QA process;  3. Identify and be able to implement the three major components of the QA process; 4. Define the six core functions of the QA Program; 5. Understand the Dispute Resolution Process; and  6. Define and understand the necessary steps of a good contractor Quality Control Plan in order to assist in a quality product.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Joint Agency and Industry Support 

Module 3: Quality Assurance/Quality Control Program 

Module 4: QA/QC Specifications 

Module 5: Group Exercise 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for area engineers, maintenance leaders, inspectors, installers, and maintenance and construction supervisors/leaders, who operate in the transportation arena, and those wanting to learn more about quality assurance/quality control practices.   

For years, governments have allowed public utilities to utilize the right-of-way of streets and highway. Coordinating with these public utilities prior to the construction or reconstruction of a highway or road is critical for a successful project. Utility issues are one of the main reasons for delays and scheduling issues of highway projects. Planners and designers must know the proper procedures for coordinating with utilities during the design phase of a project. In this 3.5-hour class students will gain knowledge about working with utilities during the design phase of a project, strategies in successful utility coordination to avoid delays, and safety concerns during utility relocation.  

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Utility Coordination, students should be able to; 1. Explain the role of working with utilities in the different phases of project development; 2. Identify the federal regulations pertaining to utilities; 3. Explain good communication methods in working with utility companies; 4. Describe the role of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and environmental concerns during design and reconstruction projects; and 5. Describe planning utilities for safe reconstruction projects. 

 

Agenda:   

Module 1- Project Development Process 

Module 2- Utility Accommodation 

Module 3- Planning, Environment, and Right-of-Way 

Module 4- Design 

Module 5- Subsurface Utility Engineering 

Module 6- Relocation 

Module 7- Construction 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for project managers, utility coordinators, right-of-way administrators, project inspectors, or anyone wanting to learn more about utility coordination. 

Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (DTTIP) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session. It is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging. Students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years. Coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding will be discussed. The process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists will be reviewed. Students will become familiar with ways to use the FHWA TTIP template and reshape to create their own TTIP.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to:
1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding.
2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists.
3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template.

Agenda:

• Your Transportation Improvement Plan
• What is in My TTIP?
• How Do I Use the TTIP Template?
• The Next Steps of TTIP

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders; tribal planners and anyone involved with tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

LCSI is designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions to reduce collisions, injuries, and fatalities. Students will learn how to ‘read the road’ and identify roadway safety issues. A review of practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road construction, will be provided.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the need for making roads safer.
2. Separate safety myths from reality.
3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues.
4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects.
5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise.

Agenda:

• Introduction to Low Cost Safety
• The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data
• Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality
• Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community
• Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies

Who should take this course:

This class has been developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road. Students will gain knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

This two hour asynchronous online Pipe Installation and Maintenance (PIM) class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. The proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe will be reviewed. Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options and learn effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance, students should be able to:
1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options;
2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices;
3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe;
4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices;
5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology;
6. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques;
7. Explain the importance of proper bedding;
8. Describe proper maintenance techniques.

Agenda:

• Pipe and Culvert Basics
• Trench Fundamentals
• Installation Procedures
• Culvert Maintenance

Who will benefit from the training?

Members of a roadway/bridge crew, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Procurement 101 (P101) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session that is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed as well as a demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile. Students will become familiar with the five procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”. Students will also gain understanding of the guidelines set forth in the 2 C.F.R. Cost Principles and Super Circular handout.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to:
1. Understand the consequences of not following state, local and tribal governments procurement standards.
2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.
3. Recognize the importance of awareness to guidelines as set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super circular handout.
4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.

Agenda:

• The “Birds” and the FBI
• The Bear “CLAW” of procurement standards
• The “Bees” of procurement requirements

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders, financial officers, project managers and anyone involved with administration and procurement for tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the importance of procurement requirements for federal funding.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu