Class Schedule - Oklahoma - Oklahoma City, OK

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There are approximately over 1.6 million miles of unpaved roads in the United States. Cities, counties and tribal nations share a common goal and that is the desire to design safe, long-lasting roads. In this 3.5-hour Gravel Road Maintenance and Design class, supervisors and operators will gain a better understanding of the materials, techniques, and equipment needed for maintaining gravel roads. Participants will learn details about road design from construction to reshaping as well as recognizing the necessity of proper drainage. We will also describe many aspects of road maintenance from the grading process to material replacement.  This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class students should be able to: 1. Identify best practices for gravel road maintenance; 2. Describe the important of proper drainage on gravel roads; 3. List reasons for grading gravel roads; 4. Apply best practices in various road maintenance scenarios; 5. Select appropriate grading techniques needed to improve a gravel road; 6. Explain the use of culverts and how to install them; and 7. Identify techniques and applications to stabilize the road. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Why Maintenance? 

Module 2- Importance of Drainage 

Module 3- Culverts 

Module 4- Soils 

 

Who should take this class: 

Any maintenance team members that build or maintain gravel roads should take this class. 

 

This 3.5-hour class will review the installation and maintenance of erosion and sediment control devices.  Participants will become familiar with temporary erosion and sediment control devices and basic procedures for proper installation. The proper purpose and function of each device, including the required material, maintenance and typical problems, will be reviewed. Participants will gain a general understanding of storm water pollution problems and the components of a storm water pollution prevention plan.  This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercise. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completion of this Installation and Maintenance of Erosion Control Devices class, students should be able to: 1. Explain storm water pollution; 2. Define Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) and the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs); 3. List types of erosion and sediment control devices; 4. Identify proper installation practices of both erosion and sediment control applications; 5. Select the appropriate BMP for various sediment and erosion control challenges; 6. Perform routine inspections of installed BMP’s; and 7. Apply appropriate corrective measures to maintain BMPs. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Introductions 

Module 2- Overview (Why we do it) 

Module 3- Erosion and Sediment Fundamentals  

Module 4- Erosion Control Practices  

Module 5- Sediment Control Practices 

Module 6- Developing an Erosion and Sediment Control Plan 

Module 7- SWPPP 

 

Who Should Take this Class: 

Any maintenance team member who may be responsible for installation and maintenance or inspection of erosion and sediment control measures should attend this class. 

This 3.5-hour class provides students basic pavement preservation concepts. The training will guide and assist maintenance personnel in making better and more informed decisions in selecting and applying various maintenance treatments. Materials, micro surfacing, slurry seals, and seal coats will be reviewed.  Students will also learn techniques for applying and compacting Ultra-Thin Friction Course. Students will gain overall knowledge on a full range of preventive maintenance techniques and strategies to preserve their roads.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing the Pavement Preservation Strategies course students will be able to: 1. Describe the treatment selection process; 2. List factors that might enter the selection process; 3. Identify the components and value of a Pavement Preventive Maintenance; 4. Describe and identify pavement deficiencies; 5. Identify various pavement preservation strategies, techniques and materials; 6. Describe pavement conditions and review scenarios to determine whether preventive maintenance is appropriate; and 7. Define the performance characteristics of different strategies, techniques and materials. 

 

Agenda 

Module 1: Pavement Preventive Maintenance Philosophy 

Module 2: Preventive Maintenance Distress Identification 

Module 3: Micro-Surfacing 

Module 4: Ultra-Thin Friction Course 

Module 5: Slurry Seal 

Module 6: Liquid Bituminous Seal Coat 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

Maintenance team members who may now or in the future work on pavement preservation projects should attend this class.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. In this 3.5-hour Pipe Installation and Maintenance class we will review the proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe.  Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options.  Students will discuss effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.  This interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, group exercises and case studies.  

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance students should be able to: 1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options; 2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices; 3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe; 4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices; 5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology; 7. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques; 8. Explain the importance of proper bedding; and 9. Describe proper maintenance techniques. 

  

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Pipe and Culvert Basics 

Module 3: Trench Fundamentals 

Module 4: Installation Procedures 

Module 5: Culvert Maintenance 

 

Who will benefit from the training? 

Members of a roadway/bridge crews, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training. 

In this 3.5-hour Roadside Maintenance class participants will gain the fundamentals of roadside maintenance.  Class topics include the importance of vegetation management, types of roadside slopes, ditch hazards, objects in clear zones, how to select roadside barrier systems, and best practices for properly maintaining your roadsides. Students will learn how to identify safety concerns when maintaining roadside signage.  This interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this course students will be able to: 1. Define roadside basic terminology;       2. Explain a clear zone and the importance of removing hazards in these zones; 3. Describe types of roadside slopes; 4. Describe the safety edge; 5. Identify importance of break-away sign posts; 6. Select appropriate roadside barrier systems; and 7. Identify best practices for vegetation management.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Roadside Design Guide 

Module 3: Pavement Drop Off 

Module 4: Objects In The Clear Zone 

Module 5: Roadside Barrier Systems 

Module 6: Roadside Maintenance 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for road supervisors and maintenance level personnel in rural areas and small communities who have responsibility for the operation and management of local roads. 

Unpaved roads released approximately 11 million tons of particulate matter into the atmosphere in the United States in 2014 (EPA). This 3.5-hour Stabilization and Dust Abatement class provides attendees with an overview of dust control requirements and current strategies for preventing, mitigating and controlling dust on roads.  Students will learn the effects that vegetation removal, wind and mechanical movement of soil have on roads. Students will gain a general understanding of soil modification methods for improving construction operations and the characteristics, advantages and limitations of soil stabilization methods. This interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class students will be able to: 1. Explain the effects of erosion on unpaved roads; 2. Describe situations when soil stabilization will be effective in improving the quality of the soil; 3. Describe the impact of fugitive dust; 4. Identify soil issues; 5. Apply appropriate control measures; and 6. Explain how to preserve fines with dust suppressants 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Why Dust Control 

Module 2- Managing your dust 

Module 3- Stabilization (Full Depth Reclamation) 

Module 4- When you’re starting from scratch 

Module 5- Public Perception 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

Any maintenance team members that work on gravel roads and deal with the dust issues inherent to their maintenance should take this class.   

  • Maintenance
  • Group exercise

Working next to traffic is dangerous and errors can cause accidents, so it is important for personnel installing temporary traffic control measures to possess a solid understanding of their roles and how they can help prevent accidents. In this 3.5-hour Temporary Traffic Control class students will learn the key elements required for temporary traffic control. We will review fundamental principles of temporary traffic control, the importance of safety, and traffic control setup plans. We also review some of the guidelines stated in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) using more simplified, easy to understand terminology. This interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

At the conclusion of this class students should be able to: 1. Describe the needs and purpose of temporary traffic control; 2. Explain traffic control guidelines as stated in the MUTCD; 3. List appropriate safety steps in work zones; 4. Explain how signs impact the navigation of traffic;  5. Select the appropriate devices needed in a zone according to the work duration; 6. Define typical applications used for temporary traffic control; and 7. List important elements of worker safety  

 

Agenda: 

  • Liability and Risks 
  • Human Factors 
  • Manuals and References 
  • Temporary Traffic Control 
  • Duration 
  • Location 
  • Worker, Flagger and Pedestrian Safety 

 

Who should take this class: 

Maintenance team members that deploy, maintain or work within a temporary traffic control zone should take this class. 

Each year thousands of people will die in work zone related accidents.  This 3.5-hour Work Zone Safety class will teach students how to enhance safety and operational efficiency in highway work zones to make our roads a safer place.  Students will gain knowledge about best practices on ways to design and maintain highway work zones that improve safety for workers and drivers.  The training will also include the proper application of devices and practical exercises to plan, set up, operate, and remove work zone safety devices. This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group activities. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing the Work Zone Safety course participants should be able to: 1. Identify various causes of work related accidents; 2. Describe and review work zone scenarios – what to do and what not to do; 3. Explain common traffic issues including sight distance, blind curves and high speed; 4. Define common work zone issues; 5. List better ways to set-up work zones to enhance worker protection; 6. Describe traffic control and other safety devices; 7. Identify traffic control plans and why we need them; and 8. Describe flagger safety best practices 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction to Work Zone Safety 

Module 2:  Work Zone Signage 

Module 3:  Worker Safety 

Module 4:  Flagging  

 

Who should take this class: 

Those maintenance team members that may be involved in set up, maintenance or working within a roadway work zone.

Contract Cost and Negotiation looks at a case study of the most expensive mile of subway track on earth.  This review covers nine interesting reasons of how NOT to build a project. This 3.5-hour class is designed to enable learners on ways to begin thinking critically about how to look at contracting challenges for better transportation project planning and design; early and continuous innovations; right-of-way phasing; real-time pricing and accelerated design that may require additional cultural and educational shifts. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Contract Specification Writing, participants should be able to; 1.  Recognize alternative contracting approaches; 2.  Understand best practice for selection of contracting methods; and 3.  Define preconstruction services and preparation of proposals. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  The Discovery 

Module 3:  Smart Contracting 

Module 4:  Selection Process 

Module 5:  Preconstruction 

Module 6:  Proposal 

Module 7:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with the selection of contracting methods for transportation projects, preconstruction services, and proposal preparation

 

Contract Execution provides the “Who”, “What”, and “Why” of a transportation project contract while defining the responsibilities and obligations of the Tribe and the contractor. This 3.5-hour class is designed to enable the learner to define the rights of the Tribe and the Contractor with respect to ownership of the project and obligations of each upon termination of the development activities.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Contract Specification Writing, participants should be able to: 1.  Describe the various segments of contract responsibilities.  2.  Explain project development and allowable costs.  3.  Discuss alternative contracting methods. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Your Contract Basics 

Module 3:  Responsibilities 

Module 4:  Development Activities 

Module 5:  Contracting Methods 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for anyone involved with writing/reviewing contracts for transportation projects and working with contractors during the development activities of a transportation project. 

Contract Specification Writing consists of careful consistency of requirements throughout a contract and conformity with what is written in other documents.  This 3.5-hour class is designed to enable the student to understand Specification Documentation, Writing, and Language using individual practical application that includes writing “specifications” for brewing coffee.   

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing Contract Specification Writing, participants should be able to: 1.  Explain the elements of plans/specifications/estimates and FP-14.  2.  Understand the different forms of specifications on roadway construction.  3.  Explain the Tribe’s involvement in specification review/approval.  4.  Describe the different initiatives that have helped advance specification quality/consistency. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Plans/Specifications/Estimates 

Module 2:  Specification’s Role 

Module 3:  Different Forms of Specifications 

Module 4:  Different Types of Specifications 

Module 5:  Best Practices FHWA Specification Development 

Module 6:  Division Office Participation after Review/Approval 

Module 7:  Specification Effectiveness 

Module 8: Course Wrap-up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for anyone involved with communicating with bidders prior to contract award; managing a transportation project; or administering a transportation project. 

Data Use in Planning addresses transportation planning challenges; how emerging transportation data, technologies and application can be integrated with existing systems; and how advanced data and intelligent transportation systems (ITS) can be used to reduce congestion, keep travelers safe, protect the environment, and support economic vitality.  In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive insight into current transportation data technology and how it is revolutionizing transportation safety and mobility while reducing costs and environmental impacts.  A student Transportation History Trivia competition will provide a fun perspective of how transportation has evolved and how rapidly transportation is progressing. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Data Use in Planning, participants should be able to; 1. Explain the challenges of transportation delivery and logistics; 2. Communicate the link between Data Use and Safety; 3. Describe how Data Use helps relieve congestion; and 4.  Explain the link between Data Use and the Environment. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Transportation and Data Use 

Module 3:  Data Use and Safety 

Module 4:  Data Use and Congestion 

Module 5:  Data Use and the Environment 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for anyone involved with transportation that wants to learn more about the identifying areas where advanced technologies can be integrated into the aspects of the community and how data plays a critical role in helping their communities address challenges in safety, mobility, sustainability, economic vitality and climate change. 

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging, especially for low funded Tribes.   In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years.  The hands-on activity will include group participation to complete an online FHWA TTIP Template. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to: 1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal and state planning to leverage funding.  2. Describe the process of identifying the Gap between the Tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists. 3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Your Transportation Improvement Plan 

Module 3:  What is in My TTIP? 

Module 4:  How Do I Use the TTIP Template? 

Module 5:  The Next Steps of TTIP 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders; Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

 

Evaluation and Selection of Consultants is the process by which a tribe must decide on the service need; how broad of a list of consultants to have for initial consideration; how to develop the proposal; which selection process to use; what criteria to use; and who will be involved in the selection. In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on the basic process of selecting a consultant and/or contractor.  Students will complete this class by reviewing a set of engineer firms (AE Firms) submittals to an agency’s Request for Proposals/Qualifications.  After reviewing students will determine the most qualified proposals based upon criteria established.  The student will walk away with the knowledge of how to better select a consultant based upon qualifications. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Evaluation and Selection of Consultants, participants should be able to; 1. Develop a written process to evaluate and select consultants/contractors; 2. Create a process to attract consultants/contractors; and 3. Explain the importance of consistency. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  Scope of Work 

Module 3:  The Selection Process 

Module 4:  The Process Continues 

Module 5:  Course Wrap-Up/Group Exercise 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the selection process for consultants and/or contractors, and ways to successfully promote full and open competition while fostering innovation and creativity. 

Long Range Transportation Planning (LRTP) is a cooperative, coordinated, communication-driven process by which long and short-range transportation improvement priorities are determined which impact the Environment, the Economy, Land Use, Social Equality and Safety.  In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on the basic components of the LRTP which include the plans, programs and process.  A fun “LRTP Jeopardy” competition will challenge the participants knowledge of commonly used acronyms and abbreviations, some tribal history, and general knowledge about the planning process. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Long Range Transportation Planning, participants should be able to: 1. Understand importance of the “3 C’s”, Continuing, Cooperative, and Comprehensive.   2. Become familiar with how projects are selected and how funds are distributed. 3. Understand the benefits and key products of the LRTP. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  What Is Long Range Transportation Planning 

Module 3:  The Benefits of Transportation Planning 

Module 4:  The Transportation Planning Process 

Module 5:  Tribal Sovereignty & Transportation Planning 

Module 6:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the process of developing strategies for constructing, operating and financing transportation facilities to achieve the community’s long-term transportation goals. 

Project Prioritization strengthens the Tribes ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs.  In this 3.5-hour class, students will receive guidance on the basic steps of Project Prioritization and practical application of techniques for performing tasks.  The formal prioritizing of transportation projects heightens opportunities for funding and partnership.  Hands-on activities will include the development of a Project Data Book and a Project Summary Spreadsheet.    

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After successfully completing Project Prioritization, students should be able to: 1. Identify projects and develop project criteria and evaluation measures.  2.  Report findings and seek public input for consensus.  3.  Finalize prioritized projects and insert them into the Tribal Priority List, the Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, or both. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1:  Course Introduction 

Module 2:  What is Project Prioritization? 

Module 3:  How do I Prioritize Transportation Projects? 

Module 4:  What do I need in a Project Prioritization Toolbox? 

Module 5:  Course Wrap-Up 

 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of how prioritizing projects strengthens the Tribe’s ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs.   

This one-and-a-half-day certification provides students an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and skill on heavy equipment typically used for road construction and maintenance.  Students will choose two out of the four following pieces of equipment to obtain certifications: dump truck, roller, backhoe or front loader

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Field operation of two pieces of heavy equipment
  • Knowledge and skills related to general heavy equipment operations and safety.

This certification is designed to ensure that the individual thoroughly understands best practices for preventing roadway construction and maintenance workplace injuries and deaths.  

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • General knowledge of the MUTCD 
  • Temporary Traffic Control
  • Worker Safety specifically for roadway construction and maintenance projects
  • The most common causes of workplace accidents & injuries and how to prevent them
  • Proper safety protocols working around heavy mobile equipment
  • How to prevent run-overs, back-overs and vehicle collisions on the job.

This certification is designed to ensure that the individual has all the basic technical knowledge required to properly layout, install and maintain work zone traffic control.  

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • General knowledge of work zone traffic control. 
  • How to properly lay out, install and maintain work zone traffic control. 
  • Ability to interpret scenarios and complete a traffic control plan. 
  • Ability to recognize deficiencies in and correct traffic control plans. 

This certification ensures the individual has a working knowledge of roadway safety and actual work experience in identifying and mitigating roadway safety issues.   

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • General knowledge of roadway safety. 
  • Identification of roadway safety issues. 
  • Proper selection of countermeasures. 
  • Ability to interpret scenarios and utilize safety documents to solve them. 

This certification ensures the individual has advanced knowledge of roadway safety and actual work experience in identifying and mitigating roadway safety issues.   

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Extensive knowledge of roadway safety. 
  • Ability to interpret scenarios and solve safety issues. 
  • Ability to analyze data and perform a Road Safety Audit. 

This certification ensures the individual possesses technical knowledge concerning roadway drainage; including proper understanding about roadway materials to reduce the impacts of moisture, proper drainage concepts necessary to ensure a roadway’s serviceability, pavement preservation concepts that reduce/eliminate the impacts of moisture, preventative and corrective measures that ensure roadway drainage does not deteriorate a roadway, selecting candidates for roadway drainage remediation, and methods for correcting improper roadway drainage conditions.

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Roadway drainage concepts that ensure a roadways serviceability 
  • Water movement / subsurface water / surface water 
  • Earth materials / road materials 
  • Elements of a roadway needed to ensure proper roadway drainage 
  • Culverts 
  • Ditches 
  • Slopes and erosion control 
  • Roadway drainage evaluation and corrective measures for discrepancies 
  • Selection of the proper treatment for various roadway drainage distresses 

RS5-OKC:  Testing to be performed in Oklahoma City, OK at the Road Scholar Certification facilities 

This certification module ensures that the individual has the technical knowledge of maintenance techniques for asphalt pavements, including pavement preservation concepts, preventative and corrective repairs, identifying types of pavement distress and their causes, selecting candidates for pavement preservation, and methods for repairing pavement failures.

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Benefits of a preventative maintenance program.
  • Preventative maintenance techniques
  • Pavement condition evaluation and distress types
  • Selection of the proper treatment for the distress
  • Application knowledge of different treatments for pavement distress
  • Selecting candidates for pavement preservation

 Testing will include:

  • Pre-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 75% - administered electronically
  • Post-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in Oklahoma City, OK
  • Performance-Test:  Hands-on or Practical Assessment - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in Oklahoma City, OK

What to expect:

  • A student packet will be emailed to you within 2 business days of enrollment
  • Topical resources and review materials will be identified in the student packet with instructions for the Pre-Test
  • It is strongly recommended that all preparation materials are reviewed prior to attempting the electronic Pre-Test
  • The electronic Pre-Test consists of 25 multiple choice questions which must be completed within 50 minutes
  • A score of at least 75% on the Pre-test will qualify you to sit for the Post-Test and Performance-Test
  • Upon receiving a passing score on the Pre-Test, TTAP staff will reach out to you within 5 business days to confirm you are scheduled for the Post-Test and Performance-Test in Oklahoma City, OK

This certification provides participants an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and skill in the area of gravel road maintenance, including the use of equipment and materials typically used for gravel road maintenance.

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Evaluating current road conditions including proper crown, materials condition, fore slopes and back slopes
  • Construction of a gravel road including drainage and shaping
  • Ability to operate a motor grader.

This certification ensures the individual has all the basic technical knowledge required to perform effective and safe flagging duties in a roadway or job site work zone.  

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • How to stop, slow, and release traffic using a stop paddle and how to control traffic using a flag if needed. 
  • Controlling traffic on a two-way road and how to use different methods to communicate with other flaggers. 
  • How to set-up and handle night flagging 
  • Understand why proper flagger operations are important 
  • Learn the standard skillset of a good flagger 
  • Apply standard flagger control references 
  • Identify proper flagging signals and procedures 
  • Learn standard flagger practices for various situations 

This certification provides participants an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and skill in the area of effective management and administration of equipment preventative maintenance operations for light and heavy equipmentParticipants will demonstrate their knowledge and skills involving how to perform preventative maintenance on equipment typically used in monitoring and/or constructing/maintaining roads and highways

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Safe operation and use of heavy equipment
  • Preventive maintenance on heavy equipment and light duty vehicles
  • Basic management of a preventive maintenance program.

This certification ensures the individual understands the fundamental concepts of road building. It touches on all the key components of good road building and road maintenance. 

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Most important things that make a good road
  • Road and highway design 
  • Pavement structures – materials used in a good road, proper compaction, paving and repair methods 
  • Traffic considerations  
  • Traffic signs and pavement markings 
  • Soils – classification, compaction and proper paving 
  • Roadway drainage 

This certification is designed to ensure that the individual thoroughly understands best practices for preventing roadway construction and maintenance workplace injuries and deaths.  

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • General knowledge of the MUTCD 
  • Temporary Traffic Control
  • Worker Safety specifically for roadway construction and maintenance projects
  • The most common causes of workplace accidents & injuries and how to prevent them
  • Proper safety protocols working around heavy mobile equipment
  • How to prevent run-overs, back-overs and vehicle collisions on the job.

RS2-REMOTE:  Remote testing available.  (Choose this option if you would like to find an approved testing proctor in your area.)

This certification ensures that the individual has the technical knowledge to properly select signs and markings, sign requirements, proper placement, warrants, sign supports and pavement markings utilizing the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • General knowledge of the MUTCD
  • How to interpret the information contained in the MUTCD
  • How to select standard signs and sizes
  • Proper placement and installation of signs and pavement markings
  • How to properly select curve signage
  • How to determine if a sign meets warrants.

Testing will include:

  • Pre-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 75% - administered electronically
  • Post-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in your region
  • Performance-Test:  Hands-on or Practical Assessment - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in your region

What to expect:

  • A student packet will be emailed to you within 2 business days of enrollment
  • Topical resources and review materials will be identified in the student packet with instructions for the Pre-Test
  • It is strongly recommended that all preparation materials are reviewed prior to attempting the electronic Pre-Test
  • The electronic Pre-Test consists of 25 multiple choice questions which must be completed within 50 minutes
  • A score of at least 75% on the Pre-test will qualify you to sit for the Post-Test and Performance-Test
  • Upon receiving a passing score on the Pre-Test, TTAP staff will reach out to you within 5 business days to identify and schedule an approved proctor in your region for the Post-Test and Performance-Test

 

RS3-REMOTE:  Remote testing available.  (Choose this option if you would like to find an approved testing proctor in your region.)

This certification provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge about the requirements for erosion and sediment control for road construction sites. The certification will also assess knowledge about Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) including the requirements needed to obtain a permit, routine inspection checklists and proper maintenance necessary to ensure proper control methods remain effective.

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Seeding and mulching
  • Tracking
  • Silt fence
  • Ditch checks
  • Diversion ditches
  • Stream protection
  • Basic installation and maintenance procedures of best management practices.
  • Inspection documentation
  • Basic concepts involving erosion and sedimentation
  • Basic knowledge of the local MS4 (State DEQ) general construction permit
  • Requirements for acquiring coverage under the general MS4 (State DEQ) permit
  • Components of the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)
  • Temporary erosion and sediment control measures
  • Permanent erosion and sediment control measures
  • Appropriate uses for Best Management Practices (BMPs)
  • Maintenance of BMPs
  • Components of an Erosion and Sediment Control Plan

 Testing will include:

  • Pre-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 75% - administered electronically
  • Post-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in your region
  • Performance-Test:  Hands-on or Practical Assessment - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in your region

What to expect:

  • A student packet will be emailed to you within 2 business days of enrollment
  • Topical resources and review materials will be identified in the student packet with instructions for the Pre-Test
  • It is strongly recommended that all preparation materials are reviewed prior to attempting the electronic Pre-Test
  • The electronic Pre-Test consists of 25 multiple choice questions which must be completed within 50 minutes
  • A score of at least 75% on the Pre-test will qualify you to sit for the Post-Test and Performance-Test
  • Upon receiving a passing score on the Pre-Test, TTAP staff will reach out to you within 5 business days to identify and schedule an approved proctor in your region for the Post-Test and Performance-Test

 

 

RS8-REMOTE:  Remote testing available.  (Choose this option if you would like to find an approved testing proctor in your region.)

This certification module ensures that the individual can perform basic math functions necessary for highway maintenance and has the ability to read and interpret construction plans used to build and maintain roads.

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Basic maintenance math and calculations
  • Calculating areas and volumes
  • Reading Typical Sections in a set of roadway plans
  • Understanding of the views used in plans
  • Ability to interpret stationing, symbols and abbreviations
  • Details of the plan and profile sheets
  • Using the cross-section sheets
  • Locating information on the pipe sheets

 Testing will include:

  • Pre-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 75% - administered electronically
  • Post-Test: 25 Multiple Choice Questions - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in your region
  • Performance-Test:  Hands-on or Practical Assessment - Score of at least 80% - administered in-person with an approved proctor in your region

What to expect:

  • A student packet will be emailed to you within 2 business days of enrollment
  • Topical resources and review materials will be identified in the student packet with instructions for the Pre-Test
  • It is strongly recommended that all preparation materials are reviewed prior to attempting the electronic Pre-Test
  • The electronic Pre-Test consists of 25 multiple choice questions which must be completed within 50 minutes
  • A score of at least 75% on the Pre-test will qualify you to sit for the Post-Test and Performance-Test
  • Upon receiving a passing score on the Pre-Test, TTAP staff will reach out to you within 5 business days to identify and schedule an approved proctor in your region for the Post-Test and Performance-Test

Foundation for Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a 2-hour self-paced class designed to provide Tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost GIS solutions into their day-to-day activities.  You cannot manage what you cannot measure – how to develop a basic map of your road inventory.  Topics discussed include: a brief history of the use and rapid development of GIS, the current availability of low cost, full featured GIS software platforms and the current availability of data and data types.  Attendees will leave with the tools necessary to develop a basic map of their roadway assets.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Understand a basic history of GIS. 2. Describe the rapid advancement of GIS and its availability.  3. Demonstrate how to download available GIS software. 4. Demonstrate how to find, download and load data. Demonstrate how to export data to Google Earth. 5. Understand the importance of having an updated inventory in which you control and understand.

Who should take this class:

 This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GIS is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to acquire, manage and illustrate data.  Attendees will gain insight into modern data sources and software for the development of a digital inventory.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

There are approximately over 1.6 million miles of unpaved roads in the United States. Cities, counties and tribal nations share a common goal and that is the desire to design safe, long-lasting roads. In this online class, supervisors and operators will gain a better understanding of the materials, techniques, and equipment needed for maintaining gravel roads. Students will learn details about road design from construction to reshaping as well as recognizing the necessity of proper drainage. We will also describe many aspects of road maintenance from the grading process to material replacement.  

 Upon successful completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Identify best practices for gravel road maintenance; 2. Describe the important of proper drainage on gravel roads; 3. List reasons for grading gravel roads; 4. Apply best practices in various road maintenance scenarios; 5. Select appropriate grading techniques needed to improve a gravel road; 6. Explain the use of culverts and how to install them; and 7. Identify techniques and applications to stabilize the road.

This two hour asynchronous online class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

 

This self-paced 2 hour online course provides a basic introduction to Child Passenger Safety (CPS).  Students will gain basic knowledge of vehicle seat belt systems, various types of child restraints (car seats), and why it is important to use seat belts and car seats.  This class will provide an overview and awareness of child passenger safety and is great for anyone who works with children and families.  

Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Understand the need for motor vehicle injury prevention, 2. Describe how crash dynamics and vehicle safety systems play a role in child passenger safety, 3. Describe the different components of child restraints and their function, 5. Understand the National Traffic Safety Highway Administration’s 5-step booster seat test and when to use a seatbelt.   

This online class provides an understanding of the data/evidence-driven process and its role in the development of a tribal safety plan.  The data/evidence-driven decision process requires an organization to understand the process of analyzing both road segment and intersectional crash data. It also requires an organization to identify possible causes and trends within the data.  These trends and causes are used to review the root causes and contributing factors that cause crashes.  This class will enable students to use data to establish a “Hot Spot” or a “Systemic” analysis process.  Students will also learn effective corrective actions that reduce the threat of additional crashes.  This type of data analysis enables organizations to incorporate it into the organizational safety plan and provides the evidence that supports safety project funding and development.   

 Learning Outcomes: 

 After completing Crash Data Analysis, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the importance of using good data to support a tribal safetyplan; 2. Identify sources for crash data on tribal lands; 3. Analyze crashdata for both Hot Spot and Systemic approaches to safety plans; and 4. Properly review a sample of a basic crash map. 

 Who should take this class: 

This training is designed for Tribal Transportation Planners, Managers, Tribal Partners and Law Enforcement.    Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads. 

Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (DTTIP) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session. It is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging. Students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years. Coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding will be discussed. The process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists will be reviewed. Students will become familiar with ways to use the FHWA TTIP template and reshape to create their own TTIP.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to:
1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding.
2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists.
3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template.

Agenda:

• Your Transportation Improvement Plan
• What is in My TTIP?
• How Do I Use the TTIP Template?
• The Next Steps of TTIP

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders; tribal planners and anyone involved with tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Various federal programs support tribal governments in times of natural disaster. Funds to restore travel, minimize damage and protect the remaining facilities are available for emergency and permanent repairs to roads and highways. This online class will review options related to submitting, adopting, implementing and funding relief projects. A variety of federal resources will be reviewed including the FHWA’s Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) program and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) tribal resources including Emergency Preparedness grants. The class will address damage assessment, damage survey report checklists and field measurements. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1. Identify disaster relief programs and their authorization 2. Identify Emergency Relief, Emergency Relief Federally Owned program intent, funding sources, and key policies. 3. Describe disaster assessment and approval 4. Learn assessment and approval responsibilities. 5. Learn emergency repair definition and timeline. 6. Explain permanent repairs and approvals. 7. Describe steps of the EFRO program administration process. 8. Understand which of your agency’s transportation facilities will be approved for funding. 9. Use eligibility statements to discuss if damage is eligible. 10. Explain how to safely collect field data. 11. Complete an acceptable damage survey report. 12. Prepare for closeout. 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for area engineers, maintenance leaders, contract specialists and administrators, maintenance supervisors/leaders, those who work in emergency repair projects, and those wanting to learn more about the emergency relief program.  

Getting your project off the ground can sometimes be challenging when there are so many details involved.  In this 2-hour self-paced class students will learn the appropriate steps to take when starting a project.  We will review the basics of project management and how planning, organizing, controlling, and measuring a project is key to success.  Students will learn the project life cycle and how each phase of a project leads to the next. Learners will gain an understanding of the role of a project manager and how their leadership has a large impact on team and project success.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After successful completion of Getting Your Project Started students should be able to; 1. Construct a project roadmap; 2. Describe key elements of project management; 3. Define the project cycle; 4. Define and initiate a planning process; 5. Identify the role of the project manager; 6. Summarize the communication process and its critical role in project success; and 7. Select a project team and identify their roles.

Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for project managers, construction administrators, or anyone wanting to learn the step by phases of getting a project started.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Improving Safety at Intersections is a 2-hour self-paced class.  Intersection crashes can be significantly reduced in Tribal lands by the application of proven safety measures for rural and urban intersections.   This class presents examples of intersection safety countermeasures for design, operations, and low-cost safety improvements.   Examples are presented along with their specific safety benefits in the form of crash reduction factors.  Topics covered include: seven characteristics of a safe intersection, different types of intersections used to manage traffic, common geometric problems that could be a safety risk and how to fix them, how to use signage for intersections, and how to maintain sight triangles. 

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing ISI, participants should be able to: 1. Describe the cost in lives for crashes at intersections. 2. Identify seven characteristics that make an intersection safe. 3. Describe the types of traffic control used to manage different volumes of vehicles through intersections. 4. Understand the features that describe the geometry of an intersection and how they influence motorists. 5. Identify common geometric problems that could create a safety risk and how to fix them. 6. Understand how to use signs correctly to improve safety at intersections. 7. List different types of countermeasures to improve intersection safety and how to how to implement them. 8. Describe the importance of sight triangles and how to calculate them.

Who should take this class:

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public at intersections.  Attendees will gain the knowledge of how to make intersections safer, reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Students will become familiar with temporary erosion and sediment control devices and basic procedures for proper installation. The proper purpose and function of each device, including the required material, maintenance and typical problems, will be reviewed. Students will gain a general understanding of storm water pollution problems and the components of a storm water pollution prevention plan.  

Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Explain storm water pollution; 2. Define Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) and the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs); 3. List types of erosion and sediment control devices; 4. Identify proper installation practices of both erosion and sediment control applications; 5. Select the appropriate BMP for various sediment and erosion control challenges; 6. Perform routine inspections of installed BMP’s; and 7. Apply appropriate corrective measures to maintain BMPs. 

This two hour asynchronous online class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is a 2-hour self-paced class designed to provide Tribal agencies with an understanding of how GPS has developed into the robust system that it is today.  How we navigated before GPS, the current state of today’s GPS and how agencies may utilize existing systems will be discussed.  Whether they currently use GPS or not, attendees will leave with a deeper understanding Geographic Information Systems.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Explain why we use GPS. 2. Describe the methods used for navigation before GPS. 3. Demonstrate how disaster has lead innovation. 4. Review the rapid advancement of GPS and its availability.  5. Review current GPS/GNSS Systems and how they work.

Who should take this class:

 This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GPS units is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn the background, structure and availability of today’s GPS Systems. 

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Project inspectors play a critical role in ensuring contractors meet all elements and requirements of the construction plans. They are the “eyes and ears” ensuring the procedures and requirements of the plans are followed and are important stewards of resources involved in project construction.  A good project inspector is one who not only understands the desired outcomes and processes involved to successfully complete a project but is able to work with the contractor to help steer them toward solutions to potential problems.  In this self-p[ace 2 hour class students will gain knowledge of the construction inspection process and the elements needed to be a good inspector.

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Introduction to Highway Construction Inspection, students should be able to; 1. Explain the importance and need for good project inspection; 2. Identify the elements of a transportation project; 3. Identify the role of project inspection in the QA/QC process; 4. Define the requirements of the highway inspection process; 5. Identify and be able to implement the official duties of a project inspector; and 6. Utilize the needed documents and tools in the inspection process.

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for project managers, construction and maintenance inspectors, area engineers, record keepers, and anyone involved or interested in wanting to learn more about the highway construction inspection.

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

LCSI is designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions to reduce collisions, injuries, and fatalities. Students will learn how to ‘read the road’ and identify roadway safety issues. A review of practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road construction, will be provided.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the need for making roads safer.
2. Separate safety myths from reality.
3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues.
4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects.
5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise.

Agenda:

• Introduction to Low Cost Safety
• The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data
• Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality
• Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community
• Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies

Who should take this course:

This class has been developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road. Students will gain knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

This two hour asynchronous online Pipe Installation and Maintenance (PIM) class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. The proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe will be reviewed. Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options and learn effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance, students should be able to:
1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options;
2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices;
3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe;
4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices;
5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology;
6. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques;
7. Explain the importance of proper bedding;
8. Describe proper maintenance techniques.

Agenda:

• Pipe and Culvert Basics
• Trench Fundamentals
• Installation Procedures
• Culvert Maintenance

Who will benefit from the training?

Members of a roadway/bridge crew, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Procurement 101 (P101) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session that is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed as well as a demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile. Students will become familiar with the five procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”. Students will also gain understanding of the guidelines set forth in the 2 C.F.R. Cost Principles and Super Circular handout.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to:
1. Understand the consequences of not following state, local and tribal governments procurement standards.
2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.
3. Recognize the importance of awareness to guidelines as set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super circular handout.
4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.

Agenda:

• The “Birds” and the FBI
• The Bear “CLAW” of procurement standards
• The “Bees” of procurement requirements

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders, financial officers, project managers and anyone involved with administration and procurement for tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the importance of procurement requirements for federal funding.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Project Prioritization strengthens the Tribes ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs.  In this 2-hour self-paced class, students will receive guidance on the basic steps of Project Prioritization and practical application of techniques for performing tasks.  The formal prioritizing of transportation projects heightens opportunities for funding and partnership.   

 Learning Outcomes:

 After successfully completing Project Prioritization, students should be able to: 1. Identify projects and develop project criteria and evaluation measures.  2.  Report findings and seek public input for consensus.  3.  Finalize prioritized projects and insert them into the Tribal Priority List, the Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, or both.

 Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of how prioritizing projects strengthens the Tribe’s ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs. 

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

 

Road Safety Audits (RSA) is a 2 Hour self-paced online class. Participants in this class will learn how to improve transportation safety by applying a proactive approach to reduce collisions and their severity in Tribal lands. These techniques provide an examination of a roadway by an independent, qualified audit team. The RSA is a way for an agency to improve roadway safety, reduce injuries and fatalities, and to communicate to the public how they are working toward these goals. This course includes topics such as: RSA definition and history, how to conduct a RSA, and identifying the common safety issues found with RSA’s.  Participants will leave the workshop with a working knowledge on how to perform a road safety audit.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing Road Safety Audits, participants should be able to: 1. Define why we need Road Safety Audits 2. Describe the process for completing a Road Safety Audit 3. Describe Risk and Safety 4. Recognize common issues found while conducting RSA’s 5. Demonstrate how to perform a RSA through examples.

 Who should take this class:

 This class was developed to provide road safety audit training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to perform a road safety audit.  Attendees will gain knowledge of a process on how to take a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads.

The Single Audit 2-hour self-paced class provides direction on how to best prepare for an Audit and when Single Audits are required for Tribal transportation projects.  

Learning Outcomes:

 After successfully completing Single Audit, participants should be able to: 1. Understand how to prepare for a successful Tribal transportation project Single Audit.  2.  Use the “SMART” Corrective Action Plan guideline to successfully resolve any Single Audit findings.  3.  Know where to find resources to assist with successful Single Audit requirements. 

 Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Financial Officers, Project Managers and anyone involved with administration of Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of audit requirements for federal funding. 

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

For years, governments have allowed public utilities to utilize the right-of-way of streets and highway. Coordinating with these public utilities prior to the construction or reconstruction of a highway or road is critical for a successful project. Utility issues are one of the main reasons for delays and scheduling issues of highway projects. Planners and designers must know the proper procedures for coordinating with utilities during the design phase of a project. In this 2-hour self-paced class students will gain knowledge about working with utilities during the design phase of a project, strategies in successful utility coordination to avoid delays, and safety concerns during utility relocation.

 Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Utility Coordination, students should be able to; 1. Explain the role of working with utilities in the different phases of project development; 2. Identify the federal regulations pertaining to utilities; 3. Explain good communication methods in working with utility companies; 4. Describe the role of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and environmental concerns during design and reconstruction projects; and 5. Describe planning utilities for safe reconstruction projects.

Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for project managers, utility coordinators, right-of-way administrators, project inspectors, or anyone wanting to learn more about utility coordination.

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