Class Schedule - Montana - Billings, MT

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Developing inventories of highway features allows transportation departments to manage their assets needs, ultimately leading to improved compliance with local regulations.  This 3.5-hour class introduces the reasons, benefits and techniques for developing an inventory of highway features. Combining lecture, class discussions and group exercise, the class addresses the benefits of maintaining an inventory of highway features, the proper techniques for conducting roadside inventory of highway features, common practices for utilizing asset management systems to develop an effective strategy for highway feature management.  

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the Inventory of Highway Features class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the purpose of developing an inventory of highway features; 2. Explain the highway features that should be inventoried; 3. Identify the equipment needed to conduct highway feature inventories; 4. Properly record elements of a highway feature inventory; and 5. Conduct a maintenance condition assessment.  

 

Agenda 

Module 1: Highway feature inventory 

Module 2: Highway feature terminology 

Module 3: Highway feature inventory elements 

Module 4: Data collection practices 

Module 5: Linear referencing system 

Module 6: Feature identification 

Module 7: Group exercise 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with developing an inventory of highway features is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical to the success of developing an inventory of highway features. 

Foundation for Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost GIS solutions into their day-to-day activities. Discussions will focus on the key steps to develop a basic map of road inventory.  Topics include a brief history of the use and rapid development of GIS, the current availability of low cost, full featured GIS software platforms, and the current availability of data and data types. Students will leave the class with the tools necessary to develop a basic map of their roadway assets. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Understand a basic history of GIS. 2. Describe the rapid advancement of GIS and its availability.  3. Demonstrate how to download available GIS software. 4. Demonstrate how to find, download and load data. Demonstrate how to export data to Google Earth. 5. Understand the importance of having an updated inventory in which you control and understand.  

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Brief history of GIS 

Module 2: Today’s GIS Environment – Open Source 

Module 3: GIS Fundamentals 

Module 4: Transform Data 

Module 5: GIS Software 

Module 6: Hands-On Training  

Module 7: Course Wrap Up 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GIS is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to acquire, manage and illustrate data.  Attendees will gain insight into modern data sources and software for the development of a digital inventory. 

Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Data Collection and Asset Management is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with a discussion on how GPS may be used in the day to day management of a network.  Review of a variety of available GPS units and their associated capabilities will be undertaken.  This hands-on class is designed for both the novice attendee with no GPS experience as well as daily users of GPS.  Attendees currently using GPS are encouraged to bring their device to the class. 

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Describe a variety of currently available GPS units.  2. Understand the difference between GPS Hardware and GPS Software. 3. Describe basic inputs / outputs of a GPS device.  3. Hands-on portion of the course will allow attendees to: Demonstrate how to properly set up a GPS device, record demonstrational data and export recorded data to a computer database.   

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Review of available types of GPS Hardware 

Module 2: Review of differences between types of GPS devices 

Module 3: Digitizing Data vs GPS collection 

Module 4: Review CRS/Datum/projections 

Module 5: Know what you will be collecting – know when to ‘hang it up’ 

Module 6: Transportation Asset Management Plan 

Module 7: GPS vs GIS 

Module 8: Hands on training exercise  

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GPS units is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn the background, structure and availability of today’s GPS Systems.   

 

Asset management is the strategic and systematic process of operating, maintaining, and improving physical assets with a focus on engineering and economic analysis based upon quality information. Asset management helps to identify a structured sequence of maintenance, preservation, repair, rehabilitation, and replacement actions that will achieve and sustain a desired state of good repair over the lifecycle of the assets at minimum practical cost.  A properly developed Asset and Data Management Plan (ADMP) provides Tribal leaders with a tool for making infrastructure investments and sound resource utilization decisions.  This 3.5-hour class introduces asset and data management guiding principles and key components of asset and data management to Tribal organizations.


Learning outcomes
:

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: 1. Define asset and data management; 2. Define guiding principles of asset and data management; 3. Describe the ways that an asset and data management plan is used as a communication tool with internal and external stakeholders; 4. List the typical contents of an asset and data management plan; 5. identify the strategic components of an asset and management plan; and 6. Identify key sources of information that will contribute to the development of a Tribal Asset and Management Plan.


The course content includes:

  • The use of an ADMP in transportation agencies
  • Typical content of an ADMP
  • Creating an ADMP
  • Performance measures
  • Examples of ADMPs at various levels of maturity
  • Effective ADMP communication practices

Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with an understanding of how GPS has developed into the robust system that it is today.  How we navigated before GPS, the current state of today’s GPS and how agencies may utilize existing systems will be discussed.  Whether they currently use GPS or not, attendees will leave the workshop with a deeper understanding Geographic Information Systems. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of this class, participants should be able to: 1. Explain why we use GPS.  2. Describe the methods used for navigation before GPS.  3. Demonstrate how disaster has lead innovation.  4. Review the rapid advancement of GPS and its availability.  5. Review current GPS/GNSS Systems and how they work. 

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Brief history of navigation before GPS 

Module 2: Putting together the pieces of a GPS System 

Module 3: The Space Race 

Module 4: Civilian Availability – Selective Availability 

Module 5: GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) 

Module 6: How many satellites does it take to determine a position?  

Module 7: GPS Errors / GPS Augmentation 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GPS units is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn the background, structure and availability of today’s GPS Systems. 

Maintenance Condition Assessment is a 3.5 hour class designed to provide tribal agencies with a discussion on how and why you perform a basic maintenance condition assessment.  A quality management system depends upon good data, therefore the information collected must be consistent and dependable.  Developing a method for collecting roadway maintenance information in order to assess the overall condition of roadway assets provides the data to create a maintenance condition assessment.  A maintenance condition assessment allows public agencies to identify required funding levels, a strategy for prioritizing maintenance conditions and areas of excessively high or low maintenance.    

 

Learning Outcomes:  

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Describe a variety of currently available GPS units.  2. Understand the difference between GPS Hardware and GPS Software. 3. Describe basic inputs / outputs of a GPS device.  3. Hands-on portion of the course will allow attendees to: Demonstrate how to properly set up a GPS device, record demonstrational data and export recorded data to a computer database.   

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Explain the definition of a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 2: Explain the purpose of a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 3: Identify the equipment needed to conduct a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 4: Identify the elements of a maintenance condition assessment 

Module 5: Record the results of a maintenance condition assessment 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with maintenance condition assessments is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical to the success of a maintenance condition assessment. 

Objective prioritization of needs is the process of managing the relative importance and urgency of different requirements to cope with the limited transportation resources. Adequate prioritization ensures the most critical requirements are addressed immediately in case time or budgets run out.  This 3.5 hour class provides an understanding of the process for managing resources to their maximum extent.  This interactive class combines classroom instruction with practical exercises and group discussion to maximize course retention.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon successful completion of the Objective Prioritization of Needs class, students will be able to: 1. Prioritize needs; 2. Conduct a needs assessment; 3. Identify project goals and objectives; 4. Identify the role of the stakeholder; 5. Identify constraints; 6. Validate needs; 6. Compare Costs; and 7. Perform gap analysis  

 

Agenda:  

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: Inputs, restraints, enablers and activities of a Needs Assessment 

Module 3: Stakeholder involvement 

Module 4: Cost comparison/estimating 

Module 5: Properly identify needs 

Module 6: Validate key needs 

Module 7: Group Exercise 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with objective prioritization of needs is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical to implementing effective objective prioritization of needs. 

 

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an economic analysis tool that allows transportation officials to quantify the differential costs of alternative investment options for a given project. LCCA can be used to study either new construction projects or to examine preservation strategies for existing transportation assets. This 3.5-hour class introduces several transportation related products, treatment types and practices for life cycle cost consideration.   

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the Understanding Life Cycle Costs and Optimum Treatment Types class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain life cycle cost terminology; 2. Perform a life cycle cost analysis; 3. Establish alternative strategies; 4. Determine net present value for different strategies; 5. Evaluate rehabilitation activities; and 6. Discount costs and benefits annually.   

 

Agenda: 

Module 1: Introduction 

Module 2: The use of a LCCA with existing projects and new projects 

Module 3: Alternative design treatments/options 

Module 4: Road user impacts/costs 

Module 5: Rehabilitation activities 

Module 6: Preventive maintenance activities 

Module 7: Maintenance Costs 

Module 8: Comparing typical lifespan of strategies and activities 

Module 9: Net present value 

Module 10: Group Exercise 

 

Who should take this class: 

This class was developed for managers and analysists alike.  Previous experience with understanding life cycle costs is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn techniques critical for properly performing life cycle costs analysis.

This certification ensures the individual understands the fundamental concepts of road building. It touches on all the key components of good road building and road maintenance. 

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • Most important things that make a good road
  • Road and highway design 
  • Pavement structures – materials used in a good road, proper compaction, paving and repair methods 
  • Traffic considerations  
  • Traffic signs and pavement markings 
  • Soils – classification, compaction and proper paving 
  • Roadway drainage 

This certification is designed to ensure that the individual thoroughly understands best practices for preventing roadway construction and maintenance workplace injuries and deaths.  

Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:

  • General knowledge of the MUTCD 
  • Temporary Traffic Control
  • Worker Safety specifically for roadway construction and maintenance projects
  • The most common causes of workplace accidents & injuries and how to prevent them
  • Proper safety protocols working around heavy mobile equipment
  • How to prevent run-overs, back-overs and vehicle collisions on the job.

Foundation for Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a 2-hour self-paced class designed to provide Tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost GIS solutions into their day-to-day activities.  You cannot manage what you cannot measure – how to develop a basic map of your road inventory.  Topics discussed include: a brief history of the use and rapid development of GIS, the current availability of low cost, full featured GIS software platforms and the current availability of data and data types.  Attendees will leave with the tools necessary to develop a basic map of their roadway assets.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Understand a basic history of GIS. 2. Describe the rapid advancement of GIS and its availability.  3. Demonstrate how to download available GIS software. 4. Demonstrate how to find, download and load data. Demonstrate how to export data to Google Earth. 5. Understand the importance of having an updated inventory in which you control and understand.

Who should take this class:

 This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GIS is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to acquire, manage and illustrate data.  Attendees will gain insight into modern data sources and software for the development of a digital inventory.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

There are approximately over 1.6 million miles of unpaved roads in the United States. Cities, counties and tribal nations share a common goal and that is the desire to design safe, long-lasting roads. In this online class, supervisors and operators will gain a better understanding of the materials, techniques, and equipment needed for maintaining gravel roads. Students will learn details about road design from construction to reshaping as well as recognizing the necessity of proper drainage. We will also describe many aspects of road maintenance from the grading process to material replacement.  

 Upon successful completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Identify best practices for gravel road maintenance; 2. Describe the important of proper drainage on gravel roads; 3. List reasons for grading gravel roads; 4. Apply best practices in various road maintenance scenarios; 5. Select appropriate grading techniques needed to improve a gravel road; 6. Explain the use of culverts and how to install them; and 7. Identify techniques and applications to stabilize the road.

This two hour asynchronous online class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

 

This self-paced 2 hour online course provides a basic introduction to Child Passenger Safety (CPS).  Students will gain basic knowledge of vehicle seat belt systems, various types of child restraints (car seats), and why it is important to use seat belts and car seats.  This class will provide an overview and awareness of child passenger safety and is great for anyone who works with children and families.  

Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Understand the need for motor vehicle injury prevention, 2. Describe how crash dynamics and vehicle safety systems play a role in child passenger safety, 3. Describe the different components of child restraints and their function, 5. Understand the National Traffic Safety Highway Administration’s 5-step booster seat test and when to use a seatbelt.   

This online class provides an understanding of the data/evidence-driven process and its role in the development of a tribal safety plan.  The data/evidence-driven decision process requires an organization to understand the process of analyzing both road segment and intersectional crash data. It also requires an organization to identify possible causes and trends within the data.  These trends and causes are used to review the root causes and contributing factors that cause crashes.  This class will enable students to use data to establish a “Hot Spot” or a “Systemic” analysis process.  Students will also learn effective corrective actions that reduce the threat of additional crashes.  This type of data analysis enables organizations to incorporate it into the organizational safety plan and provides the evidence that supports safety project funding and development.   

 Learning Outcomes: 

 After completing Crash Data Analysis, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the importance of using good data to support a tribal safetyplan; 2. Identify sources for crash data on tribal lands; 3. Analyze crashdata for both Hot Spot and Systemic approaches to safety plans; and 4. Properly review a sample of a basic crash map. 

 Who should take this class: 

This training is designed for Tribal Transportation Planners, Managers, Tribal Partners and Law Enforcement.    Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will gain knowledge on a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads. 

Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (DTTIP) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session. It is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging. Students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years. Coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding will be discussed. The process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists will be reviewed. Students will become familiar with ways to use the FHWA TTIP template and reshape to create their own TTIP.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, students should be able to:
1. Explain the importance of coordinating with federal agencies to leverage funding.
2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists.
3. Describe the ways to use the FHWA TTIP Template.

Agenda:

• Your Transportation Improvement Plan
• What is in My TTIP?
• How Do I Use the TTIP Template?
• The Next Steps of TTIP

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders; tribal planners and anyone involved with tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the transportation improvement plan process.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Various federal programs support tribal governments in times of natural disaster. Funds to restore travel, minimize damage and protect the remaining facilities are available for emergency and permanent repairs to roads and highways. This online class will review options related to submitting, adopting, implementing and funding relief projects. A variety of federal resources will be reviewed including the FHWA’s Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) program and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) tribal resources including Emergency Preparedness grants. The class will address damage assessment, damage survey report checklists and field measurements. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1. Identify disaster relief programs and their authorization 2. Identify Emergency Relief, Emergency Relief Federally Owned program intent, funding sources, and key policies. 3. Describe disaster assessment and approval 4. Learn assessment and approval responsibilities. 5. Learn emergency repair definition and timeline. 6. Explain permanent repairs and approvals. 7. Describe steps of the EFRO program administration process. 8. Understand which of your agency’s transportation facilities will be approved for funding. 9. Use eligibility statements to discuss if damage is eligible. 10. Explain how to safely collect field data. 11. Complete an acceptable damage survey report. 12. Prepare for closeout. 

 

Who Should Take This Class: 

This class is intended for area engineers, maintenance leaders, contract specialists and administrators, maintenance supervisors/leaders, those who work in emergency repair projects, and those wanting to learn more about the emergency relief program.  

Getting your project off the ground can sometimes be challenging when there are so many details involved.  In this 2-hour self-paced class students will learn the appropriate steps to take when starting a project.  We will review the basics of project management and how planning, organizing, controlling, and measuring a project is key to success.  Students will learn the project life cycle and how each phase of a project leads to the next. Learners will gain an understanding of the role of a project manager and how their leadership has a large impact on team and project success.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After successful completion of Getting Your Project Started students should be able to; 1. Construct a project roadmap; 2. Describe key elements of project management; 3. Define the project cycle; 4. Define and initiate a planning process; 5. Identify the role of the project manager; 6. Summarize the communication process and its critical role in project success; and 7. Select a project team and identify their roles.

Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for project managers, construction administrators, or anyone wanting to learn the step by phases of getting a project started.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Improving Safety at Intersections is a 2-hour self-paced class.  Intersection crashes can be significantly reduced in Tribal lands by the application of proven safety measures for rural and urban intersections.   This class presents examples of intersection safety countermeasures for design, operations, and low-cost safety improvements.   Examples are presented along with their specific safety benefits in the form of crash reduction factors.  Topics covered include: seven characteristics of a safe intersection, different types of intersections used to manage traffic, common geometric problems that could be a safety risk and how to fix them, how to use signage for intersections, and how to maintain sight triangles. 

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing ISI, participants should be able to: 1. Describe the cost in lives for crashes at intersections. 2. Identify seven characteristics that make an intersection safe. 3. Describe the types of traffic control used to manage different volumes of vehicles through intersections. 4. Understand the features that describe the geometry of an intersection and how they influence motorists. 5. Identify common geometric problems that could create a safety risk and how to fix them. 6. Understand how to use signs correctly to improve safety at intersections. 7. List different types of countermeasures to improve intersection safety and how to how to implement them. 8. Describe the importance of sight triangles and how to calculate them.

Who should take this class:

This class was developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public at intersections.  Attendees will gain the knowledge of how to make intersections safer, reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Students will become familiar with temporary erosion and sediment control devices and basic procedures for proper installation. The proper purpose and function of each device, including the required material, maintenance and typical problems, will be reviewed. Students will gain a general understanding of storm water pollution problems and the components of a storm water pollution prevention plan.  

Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Explain storm water pollution; 2. Define Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) and the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs); 3. List types of erosion and sediment control devices; 4. Identify proper installation practices of both erosion and sediment control applications; 5. Select the appropriate BMP for various sediment and erosion control challenges; 6. Perform routine inspections of installed BMP’s; and 7. Apply appropriate corrective measures to maintain BMPs. 

This two hour asynchronous online class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is a 2-hour self-paced class designed to provide Tribal agencies with an understanding of how GPS has developed into the robust system that it is today.  How we navigated before GPS, the current state of today’s GPS and how agencies may utilize existing systems will be discussed.  Whether they currently use GPS or not, attendees will leave with a deeper understanding Geographic Information Systems.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Explain why we use GPS. 2. Describe the methods used for navigation before GPS. 3. Demonstrate how disaster has lead innovation. 4. Review the rapid advancement of GPS and its availability.  5. Review current GPS/GNSS Systems and how they work.

Who should take this class:

 This class was developed for managers and workers alike.  Previous experience with GPS units is not required.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn the background, structure and availability of today’s GPS Systems. 

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Project inspectors play a critical role in ensuring contractors meet all elements and requirements of the construction plans. They are the “eyes and ears” ensuring the procedures and requirements of the plans are followed and are important stewards of resources involved in project construction.  A good project inspector is one who not only understands the desired outcomes and processes involved to successfully complete a project but is able to work with the contractor to help steer them toward solutions to potential problems.  In this self-p[ace 2 hour class students will gain knowledge of the construction inspection process and the elements needed to be a good inspector.

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Introduction to Highway Construction Inspection, students should be able to; 1. Explain the importance and need for good project inspection; 2. Identify the elements of a transportation project; 3. Identify the role of project inspection in the QA/QC process; 4. Define the requirements of the highway inspection process; 5. Identify and be able to implement the official duties of a project inspector; and 6. Utilize the needed documents and tools in the inspection process.

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for project managers, construction and maintenance inspectors, area engineers, record keepers, and anyone involved or interested in wanting to learn more about the highway construction inspection.

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

LCSI is designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions to reduce collisions, injuries, and fatalities. Students will learn how to ‘read the road’ and identify roadway safety issues. A review of practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road construction, will be provided.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the need for making roads safer.
2. Separate safety myths from reality.
3. Demonstrate how to “read the road,” and identify roadway safety issues.
4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during roadway construction projects.
5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise.

Agenda:

• Introduction to Low Cost Safety
• The Need for Road Safety with a Focus on Tribal Crash Data
• Road Safety- Myth vs. Reality
• Reading the Road- How You Can Help Improve Safety in Your Community
• Making Roads Safer – Low Cost Countermeasures and Case Studies

Who should take this course:

This class has been developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to reduce the potential dangers for the public on the road. Students will gain knowledge of how to incorporate a safety focus into daily activities, and how important their work is to reducing injuries and fatalities.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

This two hour asynchronous online Pipe Installation and Maintenance (PIM) class is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation and maintenance increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. The proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe will be reviewed. Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options and learn effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Pipe Installation and Maintenance, students should be able to:
1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options;
2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices;
3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe;
4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices;
5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology;
6. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques;
7. Explain the importance of proper bedding;
8. Describe proper maintenance techniques.

Agenda:

• Pipe and Culvert Basics
• Trench Fundamentals
• Installation Procedures
• Culvert Maintenance

Who will benefit from the training?

Members of a roadway/bridge crew, culvert installers, inspectors, engineers, and maintenance teams responsible for installation and/or maintenance of culverts or piping systems should attend this training.

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Procurement 101 (P101) - Self-Paced is a two hour asynchronous online training session that is comprised of four 15 minute video lectures and four quizzes.

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed as well as a demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile. Students will become familiar with the five procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”. Students will also gain understanding of the guidelines set forth in the 2 C.F.R. Cost Principles and Super Circular handout.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to:
1. Understand the consequences of not following state, local and tribal governments procurement standards.
2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.
3. Recognize the importance of awareness to guidelines as set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super circular handout.
4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.

Agenda:

• The “Birds” and the FBI
• The Bear “CLAW” of procurement standards
• The “Bees” of procurement requirements

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for tribal leaders, financial officers, project managers and anyone involved with administration and procurement for tribal transportation projects who want to learn more about the importance of procurement requirements for federal funding.

 A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

Project Prioritization strengthens the Tribes ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs.  In this 2-hour self-paced class, students will receive guidance on the basic steps of Project Prioritization and practical application of techniques for performing tasks.  The formal prioritizing of transportation projects heightens opportunities for funding and partnership.   

 Learning Outcomes:

 After successfully completing Project Prioritization, students should be able to: 1. Identify projects and develop project criteria and evaluation measures.  2.  Report findings and seek public input for consensus.  3.  Finalize prioritized projects and insert them into the Tribal Priority List, the Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, or both.

 Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Tribal Planners and anyone involved with Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of how prioritizing projects strengthens the Tribe’s ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs. 

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

 

Road Safety Audits (RSA) is a 2 Hour self-paced online class. Participants in this class will learn how to improve transportation safety by applying a proactive approach to reduce collisions and their severity in Tribal lands. These techniques provide an examination of a roadway by an independent, qualified audit team. The RSA is a way for an agency to improve roadway safety, reduce injuries and fatalities, and to communicate to the public how they are working toward these goals. This course includes topics such as: RSA definition and history, how to conduct a RSA, and identifying the common safety issues found with RSA’s.  Participants will leave the workshop with a working knowledge on how to perform a road safety audit.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing Road Safety Audits, participants should be able to: 1. Define why we need Road Safety Audits 2. Describe the process for completing a Road Safety Audit 3. Describe Risk and Safety 4. Recognize common issues found while conducting RSA’s 5. Demonstrate how to perform a RSA through examples.

 Who should take this class:

 This class was developed to provide road safety audit training to managers and workers alike.  Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, crew leaders, equipment operators, and laborers will learn how to perform a road safety audit.  Attendees will gain knowledge of a process on how to take a proactive approach to roadway safety, reducing injuries and fatalities on their roads.

The Single Audit 2-hour self-paced class provides direction on how to best prepare for an Audit and when Single Audits are required for Tribal transportation projects.  

Learning Outcomes:

 After successfully completing Single Audit, participants should be able to: 1. Understand how to prepare for a successful Tribal transportation project Single Audit.  2.  Use the “SMART” Corrective Action Plan guideline to successfully resolve any Single Audit findings.  3.  Know where to find resources to assist with successful Single Audit requirements. 

 Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for Tribal Leaders, Financial Officers, Project Managers and anyone involved with administration of Tribal Transportation projects that want to learn more about the importance of audit requirements for federal funding. 

A link to class materials will be sent to you by email upon completion of class registration. Questions: Call the TTAP Center at 833-484-9944 or email info.ttap@virginia.edu

For years, governments have allowed public utilities to utilize the right-of-way of streets and highway. Coordinating with these public utilities prior to the construction or reconstruction of a highway or road is critical for a successful project. Utility issues are one of the main reasons for delays and scheduling issues of highway projects. Planners and designers must know the proper procedures for coordinating with utilities during the design phase of a project. In this 2-hour self-paced class students will gain knowledge about working with utilities during the design phase of a project, strategies in successful utility coordination to avoid delays, and safety concerns during utility relocation.

 Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Utility Coordination, students should be able to; 1. Explain the role of working with utilities in the different phases of project development; 2. Identify the federal regulations pertaining to utilities; 3. Explain good communication methods in working with utility companies; 4. Describe the role of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and environmental concerns during design and reconstruction projects; and 5. Describe planning utilities for safe reconstruction projects.

Who Should Take This Class:

 This class is intended for project managers, utility coordinators, right-of-way administrators, project inspectors, or anyone wanting to learn more about utility coordination.

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