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Developing inventories of highway features allows transportation departments to manage their assets needs, ultimately leading to improved compliance with local regulations. This 3.5-hour class introduces the reasons, benefits and techniques for developing an inventory of highway features. Combining lecture, class discussions and group exercise, the class addresses the benefits of maintaining an inventory of highway features, the proper techniques for conducting roadside inventory of highway features, common practices for utilizing asset management systems to develop an effective strategy for highway feature management. 

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the Inventory of Highway Features class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the purpose of developing an inventory of highway features; 2. Explain the highway features that should be inventoried; 3. Identify the equipment needed to conduct highway feature inventories; 4. Properly record elements of a highway feature inventory; and 5. Conduct a maintenance condition assessment.

The class content includes:

  • Highway feature inventory
  • Highway feature terminology
  • Highway feature inventory elements
  • Data collection practices
  • Linear referencing system
  • Feature identification

A Geographic Information System (GIS) improves efficiency in the management, analysis and presentation of spatial information.  It allows asset managers the ability to quickly visualize asset conditions, risks, and needs.  This 3.5-hour class allows participants to become familiar with applications of GIS.  Participants will learn about various methods to quickly capitalize on the efficiencies of using GIS in infrastructure management applications. General GIS concepts will be covered throughout this introductory course. 


Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the Foundation for Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) class, participants will be able to:

1. Explain the purpose of GIS;

2. Explain available GIS hardware and software;

3. Identify the different input variables available for GIS;

4.  Demonstrate the benefits of GIS in support of Transportation Asset Management Program; and

5. Assess a GIS Foundation  


The course content includes:

  • Using GIS to assess and manage risks
  • Identification of needs and work conditions
  • Using GIS to understand the state of the assets
  • Using GIS to develop programs
  • Managing and tracking work
  • Strategy development
  • Performance analysis
  • Map development
  • GIS investment

Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is changing the way GIS users collect and manage geographic data. The high accuracy GPS provides has GIS professionals storing and managing their data in new ways with asset management applications. GPS provides a key component for collecting and managing data, but there are many considerations when using GPS to obtain and understand accurate information.  Attend this course to learn more about how GPS data collection and asset management are beneficial.  This 3.5-hour class is highly interactive with discussions, case studies, and group activities.


Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the role of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) within Transportation Asset Management;

2. Demonstrate the way GPS interfaces with GIS;

3.  Explain the data entry techniques GPS provides;

4. Collect data using GPS tools and equipment; and

5. Upload GPS data into GIS 


The course content includes:

  • The purpose of GPS and available GPS hardware
  • RIFDS
  • Transportation Asset Management Plan
  • GPS data collection standards
  • The transportation assets that GPS is best suited to collect
  • GPS data collection techniques

Asset management is the strategic and systematic process of operating, maintaining, and improving physical assets with a focus on engineering and economic analysis based upon quality information. Asset management helps to identify a structured sequence of maintenance, preservation, repair, rehabilitation, and replacement actions that will achieve and sustain a desired state of good repair over the lifecycle of the assets at minimum practical cost.  A properly developed Asset and Data Management Plan (ADMP) provides Tribal leaders with a tool for making infrastructure investments and sound resource utilization decisions.  This 3.5-hour class introduces asset and data management guiding principles and key components of asset and data management to Tribal organizations.


Learning outcomes
:

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: 1. Define asset and data management; 2. Define guiding principles of asset and data management; 3. Describe the ways that an asset and data management plan is used as a communication tool with internal and external stakeholders; 4. List the typical contents of an asset and data management plan; 5. identify the strategic components of an asset and management plan; and 6. Identify key sources of information that will contribute to the development of a Tribal Asset and Management Plan.


The course content includes:

  • The use of an ADMP in transportation agencies
  • Typical content of an ADMP
  • Creating an ADMP
  • Performance measures
  • Examples of ADMPs at various levels of maturity
  • Effective ADMP communication practices

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation system using satellites that orbit the earth multiple times within a 24-hour period.  These satellites transmit information to GPS receivers, which use the information to calculate the distance between the satellite and receiver.  A GPS receiver can triangulate its location on the ground with the proper number of signals, generating a 3D position (latitude, longitude, and elevation). This 3.5-hour class provides information about GPS and applications for its use in the transportation field.

 
Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to:

1. Explain the principles of Global Positioning Systems
2. Explain the required information needed for a GPS to determine a 3D position
3. Set up a GPS receiver
4. Plot points on a map
5. Take a position fix
6. Explain latitude and longitude
7. Explain the application of GPS within Geographic Information Systems (GIS).      

 

The course content includes:

  • GPS fundamentals
  • Setting up the receiver
  • Taking a position fix
  • Concepts of latitude and longitude grid system
  • Plotting and reading coordinates of positions on a map
  • Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) metric grid system

The maintenance condition assessment process evaluates the current condition of infrastructure and estimates the funding needs to reach a minimum level of service.  Collecting roadway maintenance information to determine the overall condition of roadways provides the information to develop a maintenance needs report, which addresses required funding levels, a strategy for prioritizing maintenance activities and identifies areas of excessively high/low maintenance.  This 3.5-hour class addresses the proper techniques for conducting a maintenance condition assessment, the key components of a maintenance condition assessment and proper procedures for reporting assessment data.  This interactive class combines classroom instruction with practical exercises and group discussion.


Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the Maintenance Condition Assessment class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the purpose of a maintenance condition assessment; 2. Identify the equipment needed to conduct maintenance condition assessments; 3. Identify the elements of a maintenance condition assessment to be evaluated; 4. Properly record the results of a maintenance condition assessment; and 5. Conduct a maintenance condition assessment.

 

The class content includes:

  • Reasons for conducting maintenance condition assessment
  • Conducting a maintenance condition assessment
  • Reporting assessment data
  • Elements of a maintenance condition assessment

Objective prioritization of needs is the process of managing the relative importance and urgency of different requirements to cope with the limited transportation resources. Adequate prioritization ensures the most critical requirements are addressed immediately in case time or budgets run out.  This 3.5 hours class provides an understanding of the process for managing resources to their maximum extent.  This interactive class combines classroom instruction with practical exercises and group discussion to maximize course retention. 

 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of the Objective Prioritization of Needs class, participants will be able to:

1. Prioritize needs

2. Conduct a needs assessment

3. Identify project goals and objectives

4. Identify the role of the stakeholder

5. Identify constraints

6. Validate needs

7. Compare costs

8. Perform gap analysis

 

The course content includes:

  • Inputs, restraints, enablers and activities of a Needs Assessment
  • Stakeholder involvement
  • Cost comparison/estimating
  • Identification and validation of key needs

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an economic analysis tool that allows transportation officials to quantify the differential costs of alternative investment options for a given project. LCCA can be used to study either new construction projects or to examine preservation strategies for existing transportation assets. This 3.5-hour class introduces several transportation related products, treatment types and practices for life cycle cost consideration.                 


Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the Understanding Life Cycle Costs and Optimum Treatment Types class, participants will be able to:

1. Explain life cycle cost terminology

2. Perform a life cycle cost analysis

3. Establish alternative strategies

4. Determine net present value for different strategies

5. Evaluate rehabilitation activities

6. Discount costs and benefits to a particular year. 


The course content includes:

  • The use of a LCCA with existing projects and new projects
  • Alternative design treatments/options
  • Road user impacts/costs
  • Rehabilitation activities
  • Preventive maintenance activities
  • Maintenance Costs
  • Comparing typical lifespan of strategies and activities
  • Net present value

The major goals of this class are to teach the skills of practicing bridge inspectors in fundamental visual inspection techniques; review the background knowledge necessary to understand how bridges function; communicate issues of national significance relative to the nations' bridge infrastructures; re-establish proper condition and appraisal rating practices; and review the professional obligations of bridge inspectors. This 3.5-hour class will include lecture, group discussion and exercises.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to:

1. Identify the recent National Bridge Inspection Standards (NBIS) revisions
2. Accurately code National Bridge Inventory (NBI) items
3. Identify and document inspection observations using standard methods
4. Evaluate defects based on the current AASHTO Manual for Bridge Evaluation
5. Interpret bridge inspection report
6. Determine if overall structure/structural member is fracture critical prone
7. Accurately inspect and evaluate a bridge's four traffic safety features
8. List the keys to ensuring a safe work environment.

 

The class content includes:

  • Inspector qualifications and duties
  • Bridge mechanics, record keeping and documentation (Bridge inspection report)
  • Fatigue and fracture in steel bridges
  • Traffic safety features
  • National Bridge Inventory (NBI) component ratings
  • Superstructure type identification
  • Inspection techniques and case studies for decks
  • Superstructures, bearings, substructures
  • Channels and culverts, and a bridge inspection classroom exercise.

Fundamentals of Bridge Maintenance teaches the participant the fundamental aspects of an effective bridge maintenance program. This 3.5-hour class explains the importance of a balanced bridge maintenance program and the organizational structure of the bridge maintenance unit. This class will review bridge maintenance management that will provide basic information about bridge inspections and reviews the general concept of Maintenance Management Systems (MMS) and Bridge Management systems (BMS). This class contains lecture with group discussion and exercises.

 

Learning Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to:

1. Describe common organizational structures of transportation agencies, the role of the bridge maintenance unit and the various cost-effective maintenance and preservation activities that these units perform
2.Review various bridge maintenance program management activities and tools used to facilitate the accomplishment of these activities
3. Classify bridge components, associated elements, and their intended function for commonly used materials
4. Review the fundamentals of bridge mechanics and behaviors
5. Review the fundamental steps involved in using concrete as a repair material
6. Describe general maintenance practices associated with ancillary items.

 

The class content includes:

  • Importance of a balanced bridge maintenance program, bridge maintenance management and bridge management systems (BMS)
  • Implementation of bridge maintenance program activities, discuss commonly used contracting bridge maintenance methods, along with quality assurance and control measures.
  • Bridge anatomy its components, associated elements and intended function
  • Bridge mechanics as it relates to different bridge components
  • Concrete basics
  • Maintenance of bridge ancillary items

This hands-on class provides participants with the skills and knowledge necessary to operate a variety of surveying instruments. Learn to record data for maintaining elevation, alignment control points and the importance of ensuring proper grades before starting your project. This 3.5-hour class combines lecture with group discussion, practical exercises and a field exercise to enhance the training.


Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the Elevation and Grade Instruments and Use class, participants will be able to: 1. Solve math problems and perform calculations required in construction layout; 2. Explain the proper steps to set up a level; 3. Use a level to determine vertical control, to determine grade of a roadway, channel, and/or culvert; 4. Record field notes; 5. Properly read a rod; and 6. Explain the different types of surveys.    


The class content includes:

  • Types of surveys
  • Construction surveys
  • National Spatial Reference System (NSRS)
  • Optical equipment and other equipment
  • Profile leveling
  • Reading the rod
  • Differential leveling
  • Field notes/note taking

There are approximately 1.6 million miles of unpaved roads in the United States. In this 3.5-hour Gravel Road Maintenance and Design training class, supervisors and operators will gain a better understanding of the materials, techniques, and equipment needed for maintaining gravel roads. Participants will learn details about road design from construction to reshaping as well as recognizing the necessity of proper drainage. Many aspects of road maintenance, from the grading process to material replacement, will be discussed. This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercise.


Learning outcomes:

After completing this class students should be able to: 1. Identify best practices for gravel road maintenance; 2. Describe the importance of proper drainage on gravel roads; 3. List reasons for grading gravel roads; 4. Apply best practices in various road maintenance scenarios; 5. Select appropriate grading techniques needed to improve a gravel road; 6. Explain the use of culverts and how to install them; and 7. Identify techniques and applications to stabilize the road.

 

The course content includes:

  • Grading techniques
  • Why proper drainage is critical
  • Identification of road problems and solutions
  • Culvert installation and use
  • Various types of aggregates and proper application
  • Road stabilization application

Guardrails are an important safety countermeasure, protecting motorists from serious injury if they leave the roadway. This 3.5-hour class will provide instruction on the principles and practices of guardrail installation maintenance and performance. Features necessary to provide the best likelihood for good performance for metal guardrail standard systems and their end treatments, as well as length of need (including a field expedient procedure) and guardrail transitions, will be discussed.

 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the "Roadside Safety" problem and the warrants for barrier. 2. Explain how barrier systems operate. 3.Describe the installation, repair and inspection principles necessary for proper barrier operation. 4. Describe the installation principles necessary for proper terminal operation. 5. Repair and maintenance of existing guardrails 5. Inspect barrier systems for proper installation and operation.

 

Agenda:

* Module 1- Roadside Design Guide (RDG)

* Module 2- Roadside Barrier Systems

* Module 3- Guard Rail Inspections

* Module 4- Repairs

 

Who will benefit from the course?

The maintenance team members who may now or in the future be responsible for guard rail installations or repairs.

This 3.5-hour class will review the installation and maintenance of erosion control devices.  Participants will become familiar with temporary erosion control devices and basic procedures for proper installation. The proper purpose and function of each device, including the required material, maintenance and typical problems, will be reviewed. Participants will gain a general understanding of storm water pollution problems and the components of a storm water pollution prevention plan.  This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercise.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completion of this Installation and Maintenance of Erosion Control Devices class, students should be able to:

1. Explain storm water pollution;

2. Define Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) and the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs);

3. List types of erosion control devices;

4. Identify proper installation practices of both erosion and sediment control applications;

5. Select the appropriate BMP for various sediment and erosion control challenges;

6. Perform routine inspections of installed BMP’s; and

7. Apply appropriate corrective measures to maintain BMPs.

 The course content includes:

  • Factors that influence erosion and sedimentation
  • Importance of erosion control
  • Types of erosion control devices
  • Requirements for Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P)
  • Best Management Practices (BMPs) and selection criteria
  • Maintenance and site inspection practices for BMP’s
  • Group Exercise – Select BMP and diagram effective Erosion and Sediment Control Plan

This 3.5-hour training class provides basic pavement preservation concepts. The training will guide and assist maintenance personnel in making better and more informed decisions in selecting and applying various maintenance treatments. Materials, micro surfacing, slurry seals, and seal coats will be reviewed.  Participants will learn techniques for applying and compacting Ultra-Thin Friction Course and gain overall knowledge on a full range of preventive maintenance techniques and strategies to preserve tribal roads.  This interactive class combines lecture with group discussions, case studies, and group exercise.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing the Pavement Preservation Strategies course, participants will be able to:                

1. Describe the treatment selection process;

2. List factors that might enter the selection process;

3. Identify the components and value of a Pavement Preventive Maintenance;

4. Describe and identify pavement deficiencies;

5. Identify various pavement preservation strategies, techniques and materials;

6. Describe pavement conditions and review scenarios to determine whether preventive maintenance is appropriate; and

7. Define the performance characteristics of different strategies, techniques and materials.

 The course content includes:

  • Pavement preservation, its purpose and need
  • Benefits of a pavement preservation program
  • Preventative maintenance techniques
  • Crack seals
  • Slurry seals
  • Chip seals
  • Micro-surfacing techniques
  • Ultra-Thin Friction Course applications
  • Selecting an appropriate pavement presentation treatment
  • Group Exercise

As budgets for drainage structure replacements decrease, the importance of proper culvert installation increases. A transportation organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the community members it supports. In this 3.5-hour training class, proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe will be reviewed. Participants will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options.  Group discussion will focus on effective practices to prevent damaging culverts during installation.  This interactive class combines lecture with group discussion and exercise, and case studies.

Learning Outcomes:

 After completing the Pipe Installation and Maintenance class, participants should be able to:

1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options;

2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices;

3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe;

4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices;

5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology;

6. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques;

7. Explain the importance of proper bedding; and

8. Describe proper maintenance techniques.

 The course content includes:

  • Fundamentals of pipe installation and maintenance
  • Benefits of proper installation and maintenance
  • Pipe/Culvert installation planning
  • Common pipe and culvert installations
  • Basic trench and pipe terminology
  • Proper foundation for placing the pipe
  • Excavation fundamentals
  • Pipe maintenance
  • Practice exercise-Identify the problems

This 3.5-hour Roadside Maintenance training class provides an overview of the fundamentals of roadside maintenance.  The class is intended for tribal road supervisors and maintenance level personnel in rural areas and small urban communities who have responsibility for the operation and management of local roads. Class topics will include the importance of vegetation management, types of roadside slopes, ditch hazards, objects in clear zones, how to select roadside barrier systems, and best practices for properly maintaining roadsides. Participants will learn how to identify safety concerns when maintaining roadside signage. This interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercises.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing this class, participants will be able to:

1. Define roadside basic terminology;

2. Explain a clear zone and the importance of removing hazards in these zones;

3. Describe types of roadside slopes;

4. Describe the safety edge;

5. Identify importance of break-away sign posts;

6. Select appropriate roadside barrier systems; and

7. Identify best practices for vegetation management.

The course content includes:

  • Introduction to roadside maintenance
  • Safety in clear zones
  • Types of roadside slopes
  • Ditch hazards
  • Pavement edge drop off
  • Safety edge
  • Roadside hazard fatalities
  • Break away supports
  • Vegetation management best practices
  • Group exercises

This 3.5-hour training session is intended to help local agency maintenance workers ensure that their agency’s signs are maintained to meet the needs of the road user. The principles of this class will cover types of signs, materials, supports and installation. The instructor will teach how to develop a sign management system that will include maintenance, repair and replacement. The workshop will combine lectures, group discussion and practical exercises to enhance training.

 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing the sign maintenance and management class, participants should be able to: 1. Explain why traffic signs are crucial part in maintaining a road system. 2. Develop a sign management system. 3. Identify repair and replacement procedures for signs. 4. Perform maintenance to existing signs.

 

Agenda:

* Module 1- MUTCD Signage

* Module 2- Signage Retroreflectivity

* Module 3- Signage

* Module 4- Maintenance of Signage

 

Who will benefit from attending the course?

All maintenance team members that inspect, install or maintain road signs.

Unpaved roads released approximately 11 million tons of particulate matter into the atmosphere in the United States in 2014 (EPA). This 3.5-hour Stabilization and Dust Abatement class provides participants with an overview of dust control requirements and current strategies for preventing, mitigating and controlling dust on roads.  Participants will learn the effects of vegetation removal, wind and mechanical movement of soil on roads.  Participants will gain a general understanding of soil modification methods for improving construction operations and the characteristics, advantages and limitations of soil stabilization methods.  This interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercises.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing this class, participants will be able to:

1. Explain the effects of erosion on unpaved roads;

2. Describe situations when soil stabilization will be effective in improving the quality of the soil;

3. Describe the impact of fugitive dust;

4. Identify soil issues;

5. Apply appropriate control measures; and

6. Explain how to preserve fines with dust suppressants

 The course content includes:

  • Impact of erosion on unpaved roads
  • Benefits of soil stabilization and dust abatement
  • Causes of erosion
  • Solutions for unpaved roads
  • The importance of proper fines when constructing a road
  • How to preserve fines with dust suppressants
  • Application methods
  • Maintenance
  • Group exercise

Working in traffic is dangerous and errors can cause accidents. It is important for personnel installing temporary traffic control measures to possess a solid understanding of their role and how they can help prevent accidents. In this 3.5-hour Temporary Traffic Control class, participants will learn the key elements required for temporary traffic control. Fundamental principles of temporary traffic control, the importance of safety, and traffic control setup plans will be reviewed. Guidelines stated in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) will also be reviewed, using more simplified, easy to understand terminology. This interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercises.

 Learning Outcomes:

 At the conclusion of this class, participants should be able to: 1. Describe the needs and purpose of temporary traffic control; 2. Explain traffic control guidelines as stated in the MUTCD; 3. List appropriate safety steps in work zones; 4. Explain how signs impact the navigation of traffic;     5. Select the appropriate devices needed in a zone according to the work duration; 6. Define typical applications used for temporary traffic control; and 7. List important elements of worker safety

 The course content includes:

 Fundamentals of temporary traffic control

  • Use of appropriate signage
  • Traffic control planning
  • Traffic control set up
  • MUTCD guidelines for temporary traffic control
  • How to select appropriate devices for zones
  • Worker safety
  • Group exercise

This 3.5-hour class provides an overview of key snow-fighter strategies to keep roads safe and passable during winter weather events, including weather forecasting resources and seasonal planning. Snow and ice-covered roads reduce vehicle maneuverability, increase travel times, obstruct visibility and impact roadway capacity. Across the country, wintry weather conditions significantly increase crash risks, accounting for nearly 25% of weather-related vehicle accidents. Often accounting for a significant portion of a community’s road budget, it is critical for road supervisors, maintenance personnel and equipment operators, whether novice or experienced, to be up-to-date on equipment, new techniques and seasonal challenges.

 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this class, participants should be able to: 1. Identify best practices for winter road maintenance; 2. Distinguish between safe and unsafe practices related to snow operations; 3. Describe methods of snow and ice control, including various de-icing materials and chemicals; 4. Understand the best use of weather forecasting resources; 5. List the critical components for completing a dry run checklist and developing a snow-readiness plan.

 

Agenda:

* Module 1- Off-Season Planning, Preparation & Maintenance

* Module 2-When Winter Arrives

* Module 3-Road and Road Weather Information

* Module 4- Winter Maintenance & Snow Operations SAFETY

 

Who should attend?

Any and all of your maintenance personnel involved in snow and ice removal operations.

Each year, thousands of people die in work zone related accidents.  This 3.5-hour Work Zone Safety training class teaches participants how to enhance safety and operational efficiency in highway work zones to make tribal roads safer. Participants will gain knowledge about best practices on ways to design and maintain highway work zones that improve safety for workers and drivers.  The training includes the proper application of devices and practical exercises to plan, set up, operate, and remove work zone safety devices. This highly interactive class combines lecture with group discussion, case studies, and group exercises.

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing the Work Zone Safety class, participants should be able to: 1. Identify various causes of work related accidents; 2. Describe and review work zone scenarios – what to do and what not to do; 3. Explain common traffic issues including sight distance, blind curves and high speed; 4. Define common work zone issues; 5. List better ways to set-up work zones to enhance worker protection; 6. Describe traffic control and other safety devices; 7. Identify traffic control plans and why we need them; and 8. Describe flagger safety best practices

 The course content includes:

  • Work zone statistics
  • Causes of work zone accidents
  • Best practices for work zone safety
  • Common traffic and work zone issues
  • Best practices to increase worker safety
  • The importance of traffic control and safety devices
  • Flagger methods and best practices
  • Flagger duties and qualifications
  • Importance of high visibility PPE
  • Group Exercise: Plan, set-up, operate and remove work zone safety devices

How to Conduct a Car Seat Checkpoint training is a half-day class featuring in-classroom and hands-on activities, providing a basic introduction on how to conduct a car seat checkpoint. Participants will gain practical knowledge through presentation and class discussion related to event and program planning, CPS roles and goals, event marketing and partnership building.

 

Learning outcomes:

After completing How to Conduct a Car Seat Checkpoint, participants should be able to: 1. List necessary steps to conduct a car seat checkpoint; 2. List resources available to conduct a car seat checkpoint; and 3. Effectively plan a car seat checkpoint.

 

The class content includes:

  • Primary roles and goals of CPS Technicians and car seat checkpoints
  • Event planning
  • Site selection
  • Staffing
  • Event set up
  • Event operations
  • Liability
  • Promotion
  • Event follow-up
  • Resources f

Prioritizing MVIP Interventions is a 1-day training package that provides the resources and strategies to build a motor vehicle injury prevention program. Modules are designed to meet Tribes at their current level of injury prevention programming.  Using the public health approach, participants will be able to define the problems their community wants to address, identify risk factors, create prevention strategies to address the problem and implement an evaluative process. Participants will gain practical experience through presentation, discussion and hands-on exercises for prioritizing motor vehicle injury prevention and the public health approach.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Prioritizing MVIP Interventions, participants will be able to: 1. Utilize data strategies for effective programming; 2. Create effective goals and action plans; 3. Identify the steps in building an effective coalition; 4. Demonstrate how to use critical resources for a successful motor vehicle injury prevention.

The course content includes:

  • Public Health & Transportation in Indian Country
  • Tribal MVIP Best Practices Guide
  • Introduction to Injury Data
  • Coalition Building
  • Evidence Based Strategies
  • Non-Profit Focused Marketing
  • Cultural Competency
  • Planning Your Intervention
  • Public Health and Transportation Resources
  • SMART Goal Action Planning

The Safe Native American Passengers (SNAP) training is a 1-day training class that provides a basic introduction to Child Passenger Safety (CPS) in Indian Country. Students will gain practical experience through a variety of presentations and hands-on exercises related to vehicle seat belt systems, various types of child restraints (car seats), and the misuse of child restraints. SNAP does not offer certification and does not replace or serve as a substitute for the 32 hour National Standardized Child Passenger Safety Technician Training Program course offered by Safe Kids Worldwide. Participants who complete SNAP will be eligible to receive professional developments (PDs) from Indian Health Service.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing SNAP, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the disparity of motor vehicle crash injuries among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children. 2. Describe best practices for properly restraining children of all ages, and how they differ from state and Tribal laws. 3. Demonstrate how vehicle seat belt systems and LATCH are used to secure child restraints in vehicles. 4. Describe the different components of child restraints and their function. 5. Select the proper child restraint based on the age, height, and weight, of a child. 6. Recognize and correct the misuse of child restraints. 7. Properly educate parents and caregivers on the correct selection and use of child restraints

The course content includes:

  • Introduction to CPS
  • What Happens in a Crash?
  • Locking in a Car Seat
  • Child Restraint Basics
  • Rear-Facing Car Seats
  • Forward-Facing Car Seats
  • Seat Selection Skills Test
  • Misuse Identification Skills Test

The Strategies to Increase Restraint Use is a full day course that provides certified National Child Passenger Safety Technicians and Instructors new strategies to increase seat belts and child safety seat restrain use.   Learn new technology and strategies to change outcomes in your community.  Child Passenger Safety Recertification seat sign off will be available for all technician needing to recertify.  Keep certified technicians current and up to date is a great strategy to increase restraint use. 

Learning Outcomes: 

After completing Strategies to Increase Restraint Use, participants should be able to: 1. Learn strategies to maintain technician certification; 2. Provide the participant with current resources for child passenger safety; 3. Learn new technology that support restraint usage; 4. Review overall child passenger safety strategies; and 5. Demonstrate current child restraint installation skills for recertification requirements.

The course content includes:

  • Kidz in Motion Technical Update
  • Recertification Child Seat Sign Offs

The Contract Costs and Negotiations class delves into the pitfalls of the "Most Expensive Mile of Subway Track on Earth" and how to avoid those pitfalls during the contract negotiations of your project.  Expounding on "Smart Contracting" will include comparisons of the advantages and disadvantages of CMAR vs. CM/GC.  Proposal preparation will include GMP timing and Risk Allocations.  Side-by-side project timelines will demonstrate each step or phase of the contracting methods. 

After completing Contract Costs and Negotiations, participants should be able to: 1. Understand Alternative Contracting Approaches. 2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of nontraditional contraction methods. 3. Recognize Best Practice for selection of Contracting Methods 

The course content includes: 

  • Smart Contracting 
  • Selecting the best contracting method to enhance contract costs and negotiations 
  • Pre-construction proposal preparation 

 

The Contract Execution training is a half-day training course that defines the "Who", "What", and "Why" of the project contract.  Discussions of the various segments of contract responsibilities will assist in understanding the project development and allowable costs as well as nontraditional contracting methods.. 

After completing Contract Execution, participants should be able to: 1. Understand project contracts and their various segments.  2.  Know the steps of project development and allowable costs.   3.  Become familiar with nontraditional contracting methods.

The course content includes:

  • Clauses found in a project contract
  • The basics of a project contract
  • Tribal and contractor responsibilities in a contract
  • The advantages and disadvantages of nontraditional contracting methods

Contract Specification Writing consists of careful consistency of requirements throughout a contract and conformity with guidelines of FP-14. This training is designed to enable the student to the difference between "specifications" and "plans"; understand the documents necessary for Specification Documentation; what the Specifications provide for Contractors; the different forms for Specification; the different types of Specifications; and some "Best Practices" for Specifications.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Contract Specification Writing, participants should be able to: 1. Determine what is a Specification document. 2. Understand contract basics. 3. Develop specification writing skills and language use. 4. Identify methods of Risk Management.

The course content includes:

* Basics of Specifications

* Specifications Role

* Different Forms and Types of Specification

* Best Practices of Specification

* FHWA Participation

* Specification Effectiveness

This 3.5-hour training class begins with a basic introduction to estimating basics for Tribal transportation projects. Class discussion will include how an “estimate” differs from a “bid”.  The transportation project delivery process will define the different types of estimating, types of project delivery, and the compilation of how to achieve the best value for the investment.  An electronic calculation spreadsheet will be shared along with practical application on how to calculate cost-per-unit or lump sum transportation project materials. 

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing Cost Estimating, participants should be able to: 1. Understand “Best Practices” for a successful Tribal transportation project delivery process.  2.  Use “planning level” estimates beginning with ball-park figures.  3.  Relate the importance of including construction and preliminary engineering costs.  4.  Appreciate the importance for accurate project documentation.

 The course content includes:

  • Estimating basics
  • Project delivery process
  • Planning level estimate
  • The next step with construction and preliminary engineering
  • Estimate documentation
  • Hands-on exercise: determine how to estimate the cost of constructing one mile of roadway

The Data Use in Transportation Planning training innovatively addresses transportation planning challenges. Examples are provided describing how emerging transportation data, technologies, and applications can be integrated with existing systems to address transportation challenges. Discussion includes how ITS technologies and applications can be used to reduce congestion, keep travelers safe, protect the environment, connect underserved communities, and support economic vitality.

 After completing Data Use in Transportation Planning, participants should be able to: 1. Be familiar with Transportation and Data Use. 2. Understand Data Use in Safety and Congestion applications. 3. Recognize Best Practice for Data Use and the Environment

 The course content includes: 

* Vision for a Long Range Transportation Plan

* Delivery and Logistics of transportation data

* Freight trends and how it contributes to data use

* Connected Vehicles

* Dynamic Message Boards

* Data Use and Designs

* FATIS

* Automation

Developing a Tribal Transportation Improvement Program (TTIP) can be challenging, especially for low funded Tribes. A TTIP is a list of upcoming transportation projects and typically includes surface transportation projects, bike and pedestrian facilities, safety projects and other transportation enhancements, including projects requiring FHWA or FTA funding or approval. The class will provide guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years. Step-by-step instructions on how to use the TTIP template will be included. Students will review the various Tribal Transportation Program "delivery options" including PL 93-638, G2G, and Self-Governance.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing the Developing Your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan class, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the importance of coordinating with federal and state planning to leverage funding. 2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the Tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists. 3. Understand how to use the FHWA TTIP Template.

The course content includes:

* How to load the 2018 FHWA TTIP Template

* Verifying financial constraint

* Basics of submitting the TTIP to FHWA

* Group Exercise

* Group exercise: complete an online FHWA TIP Template

The Evaluation and Selection of Consultants training begins with defining the difference between the Statement of Work and the Scope of Work. An example Statement of Work will allow students to review each aspect of the SOW format and how it applies to Consultant selection. A step-by-step selection chart will be examined and the "5 Selection Processes" will be defined. The Selection Committee and Criteria guidelines will assist in completing the evaluation and selection process to meet the goals and objectives for obtaining the best Consultant for the project.

After completing Evaluation and Selection of Consultants, participants should be able to: 1. Understand a written process of evaluation and selection. 2. Know the process to attract consultants and maintain a "short list" of available consultants. 3. Review the evaluation and selection process for their best results to selecting a consultant.

The course content includes:

* Statement of Work and Scope of Work

* Evaluation of Proposals and Selection Interviews

* Sole-Source

* Pre-Qualified

* RFQs

* RFPs

* Two-part Selections

Financial Planning for Tribal Transportation training is a half-day training course that provides a basic introduction to Financial Planning and Identifying “Needs and Priorities”. Students will begin by identifying community priorities and then identify possible funding streams from the “Funding Projects and Types” handout. Each “available funding source” will be discussed in detail.

 

Students will be provided practical steps on beginning a Tribal Transportation Plan. Direction will also be provided on what to do after the Tribal Transportation Plan has been developed.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Financial Planning for Tribal Transportation, participants should be able to: 1. Identify and prioritize Tribal transportation needs. 2. Be familiar with various funding streams for identified transportation projects. 3. Be able to begin the development of a Financial Tribal Transportation Plan with a worksheet in hand.

The course content includes:

* Financial Planning Steps

* Tribal Transportation funding streams

* Beginning financial planning for Tribal Transportation

Introduction to Planning is an introduction to the basic components of the Tribal transportation planning process beginning with a group discussion to define the difference between a vision and a goal. A vital part of this training will be to assist in understanding the role of transportation planning as it pertains to transportation planning processes of the Office of Federal Lands Highway Tribal Transportation Program (TTP). There will also be a special time devoted to breaking into small groups to discuss the barriers of Tribal Transportation Planning and providing possible solutions to bring back to the entire group. While not required, students are encouraged to bring a copy of their Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) or at least be familiar with it.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Introduction to Planning, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the difference between a vision and a goal. 2. Describe step-by-step basics of the Tribal Transportation Planning process 3. Share innovative ideas to overcoming barriers of Tribal Transportation Planning

The course content includes:

* What is a Vision?

* Vision vs. Goals

* Basics of Transportation Planning

* Barriers & Solutions to Tribal Transportation Planning

Long Range Transportation Planning (LRTP) is a cooperative, coordinated, communication-driven process by which long and short-range transportation improvement priorities are determined which impact the environment, the economy, land use, social equality and safety. This training will provide the basic components of the LRTP, directly from 25 CFR, which include the plans, programs and processes. A hands-on LRTP will be developed in class using a fictional community's TTIP and Prioritized Projects. Class will wrap-up with a fun LRTP Jeopardy competition that will review and challenge the participants’ knowledge of transportation trivia.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Long Range Transportation Planning, participants should be able to: 1. Understand importance of the “3 C’s”, Continuing, Cooperative, and Comprehensive; 2. Become familiar with how projects are selected or distribute funds; and 3. Understand the importance of maintaining Tribal Sovereignty in Transportation Planning.

The course content includes:

* Introduction

* What is Tribal Long-Range Transportation Planning

* What are the Benefits of LRTP

* What are the Key Products of LRTP

* What are the LRTP Planning Processes

* How is Sovereignty Maintained in the Transportation Planning Process

Procurement 101 is a half-day training class beginning with a case-study of the largest political corruption case in FBI history. Procurement standards are illustrated on the “CLAW” of the bear.  Hands-on student activities provide an overview of 2 CFR Cost Principles for State, Local, and Tribal Governments.  

Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed. Participants will be guided through an actual online demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile. 

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing Procurement 101, participants should be able to:

1. Understand the consequences of not following State, Local and Tribal Government procurement standards.  

2. Be familiar with the five procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”. 

3. Recognize the importance of guidelines set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super Circular handout.

 The course content includes:

  • The “Birds” and the FBI
  • The “CLAW” of procurement standards
  • The “Bees” of procurement requirements
  • Online demonstration: obtaining a DUNS# and a SAMs profile

Procurement Planning is a half-day training class that identifies tribal purchasing and procurement needs and outcomes.  Participants will learn the importance of communicating within the agency, critical thinking, and researching the procurement options. Group discussions will serve as a starting point in determining whether the participant is involved in “procurement” or “purchasing”.  This training will detail the provisions of identifying the scope of work, timeline, and requirements necessary to select vendors as part of the tribal planning process.

Participants will be guided through an actual online solicitation and the requirements necessary to evaluate and select a vendor.  Group discussion will focus on the types of technical evaluations for vendors.  An overview of contract negotiation, execution and management will supplement the tribal procurement planning process training.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement Planning, participants should be able to:

1. Understand Tribal purchasing and procurement needs and outcomes.  

2. Appreciate the importance of communicating need within the agency. 

3. Recognize the requirements within the SOW, the timeline and the vendors as part of the planning process. 

4.  Realize the steps needed to evaluate and select a vendor.

The course content includes:

  • The procurement planning process and steps necessary to identify the need
  • Solicitation and selection of vendors
  • Post procurement negotiation and management
  • Online demonstration: soliciting, evaluating and selecting a vendor

Procurement Process is a half-day training class that provides a complete understanding of the definition of procurement and the process involved.   Simplified steps of the procurement process will be demonstrated through the act of ordering a pizza.  Types of procurement will be reviewed, and the various roles in a Procurement Office/Division will be defined.  The 7 R’s of Procurement will provide direction on making purchases in a manner that provides full and open competition.

Procurement methods will include a detailed discussion of simplified acquisition, formal procurement, and competitive procurement. 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Procurement Process, participants should be able to:

1. Understand applicable laws for procurement.  

2. Be familiar with the roles of individuals within the Procurement Office/Division. 

3. Recognize the different types of procurement methods, assess the need for a Procurement plan and understand various procurement policies.

The course content includes:

  • Procurement procedures
  • Procurement methods
  • Procurement plan
  • Procurement policies
  • Group activity: The procurement process demonstrated with pizza

Project Prioritization strengthens the Tribe’s ability to strategically plan and address tribal transportation needs. This training will provide the basic steps of project prioritization and practical application of techniques for performing tasks. Participants will learn how to develop project criteria and evaluation measures as well as prioritize projects for inclusion in the Tribal Priority List or Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan. A hands-on student activity will involve creating a Project Data Book and development of a Project Summary Sheet. Tips for early and continuous Public Involvement will include developing criteria and evaluations measures.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Project Prioritization, participants should be able to: 1. Understand how to identify projects and develop project criteria and evaluation measures. 2. Report findings and seek public input for consensus. 3. Finalize prioritized projects and insert them into the Tribal Priority List, the Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan, or both.

The course content includes:

* What is a Project?

* Why should I seek Public Input?

* What is Project Criteria and Evaluation?

* What are the Findings?

* Putting it all Together

Public Involvement training is a half-day training class that provides a basic overview of the legal requirements of public involvement in the tribal transportation process. Methods and techniques related to public involvement will be reviewed. Overcoming challenges of engaging low-income communities and community members with physical limitations will form the basis for classroom discussion. Strategies to leverage the public involvement process will be offered through discussion of recent case studies.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Public Involvement, participants should be able to:

1. Understand the law that gives the public the opportunity to comment and provide input to tribal transportation projects.

2.  Be familiar with public involvement during the planning phase and throughout the life of the project. 

3.  Appreciate the level of public involvement and how it is commensurate with the scope and intensity of the project.

The course content includes:

  • Guiding principles of public involvement
  • Strategies for public involvement
  • Methods and levels of public involvement with tribal transportation projects
  • Group exercise: the importance of communication when engaging the public

  

Single Audit training is ahalf-day training class that provides direction on how to prepare for an audit. Guidelines for when single audits are required for tribal transportation projects will be reviewed.  Handouts from an actual Federal project will provide guidance on setting up files to accommodate the eventuality of an audit. Standards for determining if costs are allowable for Federal funding will be discussed.  An additional review of 2 CFR Part 200 and the “Circulars” superseded by the Uniform Guidance will form the basis of classroom discussion.

Examples of single audit findings will provide guidance for audit best practices. Responsibilities for management of Federal funding will be discussed in detail. 

 Learning Outcomes:

 After completing this Single Audit class, participants should be able to:

1. Understand how to prepare for a successful tribal transportation project single audit. 

2.  Use the “SMART” Corrective Action Plan guideline to successfully resolve any single audit findings. 

3.  Know where to find resources to assist with successful single audit requirements.

 The course content includes:

 How to prepare for an audit

  • What is an audit finding?
  • How to reach a resolution to an audit finding
  • Audit best practices
  • Class discussion: 2 CFR Part 200, circulars and uniform guidance

In this 3.5-hour training class, participants will gain knowledge about construction contract administration related to appropriate office procedures and proper administration procedures to maintain accurate records for the term of the contract. A construction contract administrator is responsible for managing the terms of the contract between all parties. Contract administration requires knowledge and skills to maintain the integrity of a contract and apply routine provisions.  Participants will become familiar with elements of contract administration including the importance of the pre-bid conferences, post award activities and general contract requirements. This interactive workshop combines discussion, case studies and group exercises to reinforce the training.

 
Learning outcomes:

 After successful completion of Construction Contract Administration students will be able to:     

1. Construct and specify the need for a contract;

2. Identify contract risks and how to eliminate them;

3. Define contract administration and what it entails;

4. Relate the use of critical documentation and record keeping;

5. Summarize the importance of pre-bid and post award activities;

6. Identify general contract requirements; and

7. Explain bond requirements and contract revisions.


Course content includes:

Develop contract specifications

  • Contract risks and how to protect the organization
  • Elements of contract administration
  • Pre-bid conferences and post award activities
  • Importance of documentation and record keeping
  • General contract requirements
  • Bond requirements
  • Contract provisions

As projects become more sophisticated and tribal transportation personnel more burdened, the use of consultants to begin and complete projects is becoming more in demand. Consultants perform a great majority of work for tribal transportation groups and agencies. This work ranges from basic project development, PS&E and, in some cases, complete design/build. Managing consultant contracts is an extremely important responsibility for tribes. Ensuring consultants meet the deliverables of the contract can be a daunting task.  In this 3.5-hour training session students will gain knowledge in working with consultants in managing consultant contracts for tribal transportation projects, and in ensuring a reliable process resulting in a quality product.

 

Learning Outcomes: After successful completion of Contract Management for AE Consultant Contracts, students should be able to: 1.) Define good contract management 2.) Prepare for a good consultant and agency relationship. 3.) Identify ways staff and consultants can work together 4.) Develop successful work schedules. 5.) Communicate for successful project completion. 6.) Understand importance of payment to consultants. 7.) Maintain balance of control in the project. 8.) Identify the various steps of dispute resolution.

 

Agenda: 

Module 1- Beginning Work

Module 2- Working with Staff

Module 3- Developing Work Schedules

Module 4- Communicating with the Consultant

Module 5- Paying Consultants

Module 6- Controlling Process and Product

Module 7- Evaluating a Consultant’s Work

Module 8- Resolution Dispute

 

Who Should Take This Class:

This class is intended for project managers, contract managers, those involved with the consultant selection and oversight process, and anyone interested in wanting to learn more about managing consultant contracts.

Excessive construction periods due to project inefficiencies can frustrate drivers and can extend the possibility of additional hazards driving through work zones. Two of the primary constraints of a project are the schedule and the cost. The focus of this 3.5-hour class will help participants gain information about the importance of scheduling and budgeting a project. Participants will learn techniques to set plan schedules and budgets with key stakeholders.  Learners will understand the importance of monitoring and controlling the project performance and why it is imperative to provide continual schedule and budget updates.

 

Learning outcomes:

After successful completion, Project Management students should be able to: 1. Use various tools to make cost and schedule decisions and establish baselines; 2. Apply various techniques to develop effective project cost estimates; 3. Interpret and analyze cost and schedule performance; and 4. Identify and manage cost and schedule changes.

 

The course content includes: 

  • Project cost management
  • Cost estimating terms and concepts
  • Units of project time
  • Project cost estimating techniques
  • Time management
  • Key scheduling terms and concepts
  • Benefits of accurate schedules and the downfalls that can impact them
  • Monitoring cost and schedule performance
  • Recognize key activities for cost and schedule control

The 3.5-hour training class will teach participants how to develop a statement of work (SOW), which is an essential part of both the contract and project management process. A basic SOW should include precise work details, schedules, terms, and expected outcomes. It is imperative it is done correctly to prevent any misunderstanding on the job. During the second half of the class, more advanced concepts will be discussed. Participants will gain information about additional key elements that are required to write an effective SOW for A&E contracts.  Developing a project in phases can help maintain a more organized project and create a positive effect on the overall job completion.  This class combines both classroom instruction with practical exercises to reinforce the training.

 Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Developing a Statement of Work for A&E Contracts, participants should be able to:

1. Define a basic Statement of Work (SOW) and its purpose;

2. Arrange the SOW in an organized manner according to specific formats;

3. Use appropriate tips for writing the most effective SOW for your project;

4. Apply additional key elements and requirements to the SOW for A&E contracts;

5. Organize the SOW for A&E contracts;and

6. Select appropriate language and style when writing a SOW.

 The course content includes: 

  • Statement of Work (SOW) and its purpose
  • When to use a SOW
  • Key elements of an SOW
  • Appropriate formats and tips for writing an SOW
  • Advanced elements required for writing an SOW for A&E contracts
  • Group exercise: writing a statement of work

 

Various federal programs support tribal governments in times of natural disaster. Funds to restore travel, minimize damage and protect the remaining facilities are available for emergency and permanent repairs to roads and highways. This 3.5-hour class will review options related to submitting, adopting, implementing and funding relief projects. A variety of federal resources will be reviewed including the FHWA’s Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) program and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) tribal resources including Emergency Preparedness grants. The class will provide an introduction to damage assessment, damage survey report checklists and field measurements.

 

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1. Explain what qualifies for an emergency relief project; 2. Understand the type of work that can be performed with emergency funding; 3. Identify resources available through agencies such as FHWA and FEMA; 4.  Complete a damage assessment.

 
The class content includes:

  • Proper execution and management of emergency transportation projects
  • Review of ERFO’s guidelines for tribal governments applying for ERFO funding for road damage
  • Introduction to FEMA’s Tribal Affairs Branch and its services
  • Damage assessments, checklists and field measurements
  • Group exercise: review and discuss components of an FHWA Damage Survey Report

Meeting the environmental requirements to begin a transportation project demands knowledge about the required permits and processes. Individuals responsible for meeting these requirements must possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to document the process prior to construction beginning.  They must know which permits are required so projects remain on schedule. In this 3.5-hour training class, participants will learn the environmental requirements required per the NEPA process, to begin a project and bring it to construction and project completion. Participants will also become familiar with the language and required elements needed to produce quality environmental documents that ensure a successful project.  This interactive workshop combines discussion, case studies and group exercises to reinforce the training.

 

Learning outcomes: 

After successful completion of Environmental Permits, Certificates, and Licenses, participants should be able to:

1. Identify the various permits and certifications in the environmental process;

2. Understand when to apply for the various permits in relation to transportation projects;           

3. Identify and have an understanding of process used to fill out necessary documents; and         

4. Define the necessary steps to ensure successful documentation.


The course content includes: 

  • Fundamentals of appropriate documentation
  • Environmental impact statements
  • Scoping, purpose and need, alternatives, affected environments, environmental consequences, comments and coordination, record of decision
  • Environmental assessments
  • Categorical exclusions
  • Environmental checklist

In this 3.5-hour training class on Environmental Requirements for Transportation Projects, participants will learn about the environmental requirements needed to begin a project and bring it to construction. All construction projects have the potential to impact the environment and are therefore required to meet all federal environmental laws and regulations. Individuals appointed by the Tribe to ensure environmental compliance must know the process for meetings those requirements. Managers responsible for meeting environmental requirements need to possess the knowledge and skills to maintain the integrity of developing the project to meet those requirements throughout the planning and delivery phase. Participants will become familiar with sections of the environmental process including those required by the Federal Highway Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency. 


Learning outcomes: 

After successful completion of Environmental Requirements for Transportation Projects, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the basic elements of the NEPA process in relation to transportation projects; 2. Identify and gain an understanding of the documents needed for approval to begin transportation projects; 3. Define project management in terms of the NEPA process; 4. Relate the use of critical documentation to planning projects; 5. Identify best practices from other DOT’s; and 6. Summarize the environmental process from planning to construction.


The course content includes: 

  • The need for NEPA
  • Environmental considerations for projects
  • Storm water runoff, dredge materials, threatened or endangered species, historical sites
  • NEPA requirements
  • NEPA project management
  • Environmental impact statements
  • Environmental assessments
  • Categorical exclusions

In this 3.5-hour class, participants will learn that sometimes specific work ordered on projects may not always have a pre-determined cost before the contract is written. When this occurs, there are strategies in which the work can still be performed with the understanding that the contractor can bill the oversight agency according to current cost of labor, price of materials and equipment, plus a certain percentage for overhead and profit.  Participants will learn what work could constitute a change and the impacts these changes can have on the schedule and efficiency of the overall project.

 

Learning outcomes:

After completing the course participants should be able to: 1. Define Force Account work; 2. Explain contract considerations when evaluating changes to the work; 3. List appropriate steps agencies must complete prior to starting force account work; 4. Identify methods to track and how to verify records for force account; 5. Describe a contractor force account tracking sheet, its use and purpose; and 6. Explain schedule and productivity impacts.

 

The class content includes:

  • What types of changes constitute force account?
  • How construction contracts address changes to the work
  • Change order language
  • Contract considerations when evaluating changes to the work
  • How changes to the work can affect the construction schedule
  • How changes to the work can affect labor productivity
  • Pricing of the change - direct and indirect costs
  • Auditing and tracking change orders

In this 3.5-hour class, participants will learn the appropriate steps to start a transportation project.  Getting a project off the ground can be a daunting task, especially when one considers the details involved.  The basics of project management will be reviewed. Discussions will focus on how planning, organizing, controlling, and evaluating a project are keys to its success. Participants will learn the project life cycle and how each phase of a project leads to the next. The role of a project manager will be reviewed, including how their leadership has a large impact on the team and project success.


Learning outcomes:

After successful completion of Getting Your Project Started students should be able to:               

1. Construct a project roadmap;

2. Describe key elements of project management;

3. Define the project cycle;

4. Define and initiate a planning process;

5. Identify the role of the project manager;

6. Summarize the communication process and its critical role in project success and   

7. Select a project team and identify their roles


The course content includes: 

  • Roadmap of a project
  • Key elements of project management
  • Planning processes
  • Communication processes
  • Selecting a project team
  • Role of a project manager
  • Exercise: appropriate communication demonstration

In this 3.5-hour training class on Highway Construction Inspection, participants will gain knowledge about the construction inspection process and the elements needed to be an effective inspector. Project inspectors play a critical role in ensuring contractors meet all elements and requirements of the construction plans. They are the “eyes and ears” ensuring the procedures and requirements of the plans are followed.  They are important stewards of resources involved in project construction.  A good project inspector is one who not only understands the desired outcomes and processes involved to successfully complete a project but is able to work with the contractor to help steer them toward solutions to potential problems. 


Learning outcomes: 

After successful completion of Introduction to Highway Construction Inspection, participants should be able to:

1. Understand the importance and need for good project inspection;

2. Identify the elements of a transportation project;

3. Identify the role of project inspection in the QC/QA process;

4. Define the requirements of the highway inspection process;

5. Identify and be able to implement the official duties of a project inspector; and

6. Utilize the needed documents and tools in the inspection process.


The course content includes: 

  • What is construction inspection?
  • Quality assurance and quality control in the inspection process
  • Steps and responsibilities of a project inspector
  • Requirements of a good inspector
  • Elements of a project
  • Authority
  • Documentation
  • Case studies
  • Group Exercise

In this 3.5-hour training class on Highway Construction Inspection, participants will gain knowledge about the construction inspection process and the elements needed to be an effective inspector. Project inspectors play a critical role in ensuring contractors meet all elements and requirements of the construction plans. They are the “eyes and ears” ensuring the procedures and requirements of the plans are followed.  They are important stewards of resources involved in project construction.  A good project inspector is one who not only understands the desired outcomes and processes involved to successfully complete a project but is able to work with the contractor to help steer them toward solutions to potential problems. 

 

Learning Outcomes: 

After successful completion of Introduction to Highway Construction Inspection, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the importance and need for good project inspection; 2. Identify the elements of a transportation project; 3. Identify the role of project inspection in the QC/QA process; 4. Define the requirements of the highway inspection process; 5. Identify and be able to implement the official duties of a project inspector; and 6. Utilize the needed documents and tools in the inspection process.

 

The course content includes

  • What is construction inspection?
  • Quality assurance and quality control in the inspection process
  • Steps and responsibilities of a project inspector
  • Requirements of a good inspector
  • Elements of a project
  • Authority
  • Documentation

Constructing a new bridge or highway involves a great deal of planning, design, and a skilled contractor. Often, it is easy to forget about perhaps one of the most important elements of the construction process: Project Completion and Closeout. This phase is one of the most important parts of the entire project as final payment on federal aid projects are dependent on a solid project closeout process. Recordkeepers, project managers, and project inspectors play a major role in making the project closeout successful. In this 3.5-hour training session students will gain an understanding of project closeout, the elements of ensuring it meets supporting agency standards, and tips on how to improve closure of a project for quicker reimbursements.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of Project Completion and Closeout, students should be able to:

1.) Understand the basics of project closeout. 2.) Be able to utilize a good project closeout procedure. 3.) Identify the needed documents for closing a project. 4.) Understand the steps for closing a project in accordance with guidelines for federal projects. 5) Identify best practices in project closeout


Class content includes:

· Project closeout basics

· Common problems in the closeout process

· Final acceptance

· Final voucher

· Records retention

· Closeout memos

· Required documentation

· Group exercises, discussion, and case study

· Best practices and tips for more accurate project closeout

In this 3.5-hour training class, participants will gain knowledge about the ways to apply a Quality Control/Quality Assurance Program to all phases of a project, from the environmental process to construction completion. A comprehensive and established Quality Assurance/Quality Control Program (QA/QC) is essential to a successful outcome. A good QA/QC program begins in the early phases of the project from pre-planning to delivery of the final product. While construction inspectors are viewed as the key to a good construction project, all personnel involved in every phase of the project are expected to provide quality work. A proper QA/QC process leading to a successful project outcome will be demonstrated.

 

Learning outcomes: 

After successful completion of Quality Control and Quality Assurance, participants should be able to:

1. Understand the need for a good Quality Assurance program;

2. Identify the difference between the agency’s responsibility and the contractor’s responsibility in the QC/QA process;          

3. Identify and be able to implement the three major components of the QC/QA process;

4. Define the six core functions of the QC/QA Program

5. Understand the Dispute Resolution Process; and

6. Define and understand the necessary steps that provide an effective Quality Control/Quality Assurance Plan that produces a valuable project.

 

The course content includes: 

  • What is quality assurance and quality control
  • The quality assurance pyramid
  • Contractor quality control
  • Owner quality assurance
  • Elements of a good quality assurance program
  • QA Specifications/QA Program joint industry support

 

The 3.5-hour Storm Water and Erosion Control class will provide participants with an understanding about the requirements for erosion and sediment control for construction.  Participants will learn about the various types of erosion and how to select and install best management practices to prevent erosion and control sediment on job sites.  The class will cover Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) including the requirements needed to obtain a permit, routine inspection checklists, and proper maintenance necessary to ensure Best Management Practices (BMPs) remain effective.

 

Learning outcomes:

 After successful completion of Storm Water and Erosion Control students should be able to:

1. Define and identify various types of erosion;

2. Explain requirements needed for permits and Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans;

3. Describe various types of sediment controls or BMPs;

4. Select appropriate BMPs according to the situation;

5. Perform routine inspections of installed BMP’s on the site; and

6. Apply appropriate corrective measures to maintain BMPs.

 

The course content includes: 

  • Various causes of erosion
  • Effective erosion and sediment control practices
  • Requirements for storm water pollution prevention plans
  • Best Management Practices (BMPs) and selection criteria
  • Maintenance and site inspection practices for BMPs
  • Group Exercise: Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SW3P)

Governments allow public utilities to utilize the right-of-way of streets and highways. Coordinating with these public utilities prior to the construction or reconstruction of a highway or road is critical for a successful project. Utility issues are some of the main reasons for delays and scheduling issues. Planners and designers must know the proper procedures for coordinating with utilities during the design phase of a project. In this 3.5-hour class, participants will gain knowledge in working with utilities during the design phase of a project as well as strategies in successful utility coordination to avoid delays, and safety concerns during utility relocation.

 

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1. Understand the role of working with utilities in the different phases of project development; 2. Identify federal regulations pertaining to utilities; 3. Use a variety of communication methods to work with utility companies; 4. Understand the role of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and environmental concerns during design and reconstruction projects; and 5. Plan utilities for safe reconstruction projects.

 

The class content includes:

  • Utilities in the six phases of project development
  • Communication essentials
  • Utility Accommodation
  • Private vs. Public Utilities
  • Federal regulations pertaining to utilities and ROW
  • ADA requirements

This 3.5-hour class offers participants a basic understanding of the data/evidence-driven process and its role in the development of a Tribal Safety Plan.  The data/evidence-driven decision process used with a Safety Plan requires an organization to understand the process of analyzing both road segment and intersectional crash data. It also requires an organization to identify possible causes and trends within the data. These trends and causes are used to review the root causes and contributing factors causing crashes.  This class will give participants the ability to use data to establish a “Hot Spot” or a “Systemic” analysis process.  Participants will also learn effective corrective actions to reduce the threat of additional crashes.  This type of data analysis enables organizations to incorporate it into the organizational Safety Plan and provides the evidence to support safety project funding and development.


Learning outcomes:

After completing Crash Data Analysis, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the importance of using good data to support a Tribal Safety Plan;

2. Identify Sources for crash data on Tribal Lands;

3. Identify Trends in Crash Data;

4. Analyze Crash Data for both Hot Spot and Systemic Approaches to Safety Plans; and

5. Properly review a sample of a basic crash map.


The course content includes:

  • Tribal Safety Plan/crash data linkage
  • Crash data trends
  • Native American traffic safety facts
  • Hot spot and systematic approaches to Safety Plans
  • Identification of additional data sources
  • Data provided within the National Transportation Highway Safety Administration
  • Case studies
  • Exercise: review and evaluate a basic crash map

Intersection crashes can be significantly reduced in Tribal lands by the application of proven intersection measures for rural and suburban/urban intersections.   This 3.5-hour class presents examples of intersection safety countermeasures for design, operations, and low cost safety improvements. Specific safety benefits and crash reduction factors are discussed using case study examples. Participants will learn about a number of key topics including the seven characteristics of a safe intersection, different types of intersections used to manage traffic, common geometric problems that could be a safety risk and how to fix them, how to use signage for intersections, and how to maintain sight triangles.


Learning outcomes:

After completing the class, participants should be able to:

1. Understand the cost in lives for crashes at intersections.

2. Identify seven characteristics that make an intersection safe.

3. Describe the types of traffic control used to manage different volumes of vehicles through intersections.

4. Understand the features that describe the geometry of an intersection and how they influence motorists.

5. Identify common geometric problems that could create a safety risk and how to fix them.

6. Understand how to use signs correctly to improve safety at intersections.

7. List different types of countermeasures to improve intersection safety and how to how to implement them.

8. Describe the importance of sight triangles and how to calculate them.


The course content includes:

  • Introduction to intersection safety
  • Intersection Tribal Crash Data – The Why
  • The Evolution of an intersection
  • Flaws in your intersection
  • Signs -- Do it right or pay the price
  • Low cost safety countermeasures
  • Sight distance

 

In Indian Country, the most common type of crash is the run-off-the-road crash. The impact on the vehicle when it leaves the road determines the survivability of that crash. Railroad grade crossings represent another common crash location for tribal families. This 3.5 hour class identifies some of the hazards that are built, planted or placed in the Right of Way that can lead to crashes. It will also explore some of the common problems with railroad crossings and will identify the safety features of those crossings.

 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this course the participants should be able to:

1. Identify the hazards that are located within the clearzone.

2. Use the intersection sight triangle to identify present and future sight issues at intersections and driveways.

3. Review an unprotected R/R grade crossing and identify the missing signs and markings.

4. Discuss the roll and the usage of a Safety Compliance Office.

 

The course content includes:

* Elements of a run off the road type of crash.

* Clearzone as defined by the Roadside Design Guide

* How can we protect tribal members?

* What is the sight triangle of intersections and obstructions?

* R/R grade crossings

* What are other agencies doing to protect their community?

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) is a 3.5-hour training class designed to provide tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions into their day-to-day activities, reducing collisions, injuries, and fatalities.  Topics discussed include the need to make roads safer, road safety myths vs. realities, how to “read the road” and improve safety in the community, and practical and proven low cost countermeasures for safety.


Learning outcomes:

After completing LCSI, participants should be able to: 1. Explain the need for making roads safer. 2. Separate safety myths from reality. 3. Demonstrate how to “read the road.” 4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road projects. 5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise.


The course content includes:

  • Introduction to low cost safety
  • The need for road safety with a focus on tribal crash data
  • Road safety- myth vs. reality
  • Reading the road- how you can help improve safety in your community
  • Making roads safer – low cost countermeasures and case studies
  • Exercise: group case study discussion

Participants in this 3.5-hour class will learn how to improve transportation safety by applying a proactive approach to reduce accidents and their severity in tribal lands. These techniques address examination of a roadway by an independent, qualified audit team. The RSA is a way for an agency to improve safety and to communicate to the public how they are working toward accident reductions. This class includes topics including RSA definition and history, how to conduct a RSA, and identifying the common safety issues found with RSAs. 


Learning outcomes:

After completing RSA, participants should be able to:

1. Define why we need Road Safety Audits

2. Describe the process for completing a Road Safety Audit

3. Describe Risk and Safety

4. Recognize common issues found while conducting RSA’s

5. Demonstrate how to perform a RSA through examples.


The course content includes:

  • Introduction and basic concepts of roadway safety
  • Steps to performing a road safety audit
  • Understanding risk and safety
  • Examples of safety issues and countermeasures
  • Group discussion: tribal RSA case studies

Roundabouts are a proven safety solution for reducing the frequency and severity of intersection crashes and are increasingly being used on tribal lands.  This 3.5-hour class presents an introduction to the basics of roundabout geometry, the safety and other benefits of roundabouts, how to overcome opposition, and basic design elements of roundabouts.  The workshop is highly interactive with numerous discussions, tribal examples, case studies, and group activities.


Learning outcomes:

After completing Roundabouts, participants should be able to:

1. Understand the features of a roundabout

2. Understand the operational rules of roundabouts that make them more efficient than cross intersections

3. Describe the safety benefits of roundabouts and why they work

4. Understand characteristics of an intersection that indicate whether or not a roundabout would be a good solution.

5. Understand common arguments used to oppose roundabouts

6. Identify crash reduction from installations

7. Describe how to set up temporary traffic control for roundabouts.


The course content includes:

  • Roundabout basics and benefits
  • Safety aspects of roundabouts
  • Roundabout opposition
  • Roundabout temporary traffic control
  • Group discussion: roundabout case studies

Eleven percent of all crashes that occur on tribal lands are pedestrian-related. A safe transportation system must address the needs of the multi-modal transportation system, especially where bikes and pedestrians share the road with vehicular traffic. This 3.5-hour class will review effective safety projects, addressing the need for non-data-based reviews and identifying methods for addressing the needs of tribal pedestrians and bicyclists. Traditional data analysis of crash data reports does not generally show the full picture of the concerns of this traveling population.  This class will review several safety projects that have been funded, address the need for non-data based reviews and identify methods for addressing not only the needs of the tribal pedestrians but also the bicyclist.


Learning outcomes:

After completing STEP, participants should be able to:  

1. Describe the importance of using good data to support a Tribal Multi-Modal Transportation Project;

2. Identify Sources of funding for Multi-modal Projects and Upgrades;

3. Improving a Safety Plan so it meets current standards;

4. Analyze Crash Data for both Hot Spot and Systemic Approaches to Safety Plans; and

5. Review the current Multi-Modal Transportation System to insure that all of the low cost safety devices meet or exceed the minimum standards.​


The course content includes:

  • Identify sources of funding
  • Crash data analysis procedures
  • Applications for pedestrian/bicyclist pathways for non-driving population
  • Steps to improve a safety plan
  • Identify proper pedestrian/bicycle components of a safety plan
  • Review national safe routes to school program
  • Group Exercise: Evaluate a pedestrian corridor and develop recommendations for safety improvements

This 3.5 hour safety data class will assist tribal agencies as they are developing a Tribal Safety Plan to gather and review the data needed when developing or updating those plans.  As a Safety Plan is being developed, assumptions about concerns and issues may be made, while these concerns are based on experience and are very real, not all of the solutions may be apparent.  This class will assist participants to gather the whole picture of the issues, enabling them to develop a Data and Evidence Driven Decision as they develop or update their Safety Plan.   This class is highly interactive with numerous discussions, tribal examples, case studies, and group activities to assist the attendee in understanding the purpose and the types of data needed.

 

Learning outcomes:
After completing Safety Data workshop, participants should be able to: 1. Identify which data set may be required for their Safety Plan; Explain the four Es of Safety; 3. Understand how to develop a Data and Evidence-driven decision-making process; and 4. Explain the data and partnerships needed when developing a Safety Plan.

 

Class content includes:

  • Data and Evidence-Driven Decisions
  • The four Es of Safety
  • Roadway Data
  • Crash Data
  • Pedestrian Data

The goal of this 3.5-hour class is to assist tribal agencies in the development of a safety plan as well as improve existing safety plans. Indian Country Transportation Systems are managed by many Tribal, Federal, State and Local Agencies involved in providing a safe and efficient transportation system to keep up with growth and development. To enable tribal areas access to Federal, State and Local funds that have been provided to assist with the tribal transportation systems, a data/evidence-driven decision process, a Tribal Transportation Safety Plan, needs to be developed.  This class will explore the resources provided by the Federal Highway Administration/ Lands to assist each of the tribal areas in the development of these plans, as well as exploring the data files provided by the National Transportation Highway Safety Administration for tribal lands. 


Learning outcomes:

After completing Safety Plan Development, participants should be able to:

1. Understand the importance of developing a Transportation Safety Plan;

2. Explain the four E’s of Safety;

3. Describe how to develop a data and evidence-drive decision making process; and

4. Identify the data and partnerships needed in the development of Safety Plans.

 
Course content includes:

  • Safety Plan Development
  • Resources available for Safety Plan development
  • Data driven decision processes
  • Navigating the Federal Highway Lands web page
  • Navigating the Tribal Safety web page
  • The National Transportation Highway Safety Administration
  • Native American Traffic Safety Facts

As a tribal government reviews the intersections in the tribal road system, one of the types of intersections that are used is the signalized intersections. This type of intersection in most cases is owned and managed by the State or Federal organizations that manage the roadways that pass through the tribal lands. Because of this relationship, the roadway manager needs to be included in the discussions with the tribal leadership. Due to the cost and impacts of a Signalized Intersection on the transportation system the FHWA Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) provides some strict guidance when looking at installing this type of intersectional control. This course will review those controls (Warrants) in the MUTCD, into the depth to provide a basic understanding. The primary focus of this course will be on the low cost safety improvement that can enhance the operation of an existing signalized intersections, as well as some of the innovative intersection designs that are being used. This workshop is highly interactive with numerous discussions, tribal examples, case studies, and group activities.

 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing Safety Improvements for Signalized Intersection course, the participants should be able to:

1. Identify which intersections may require additional review for a possible Signalized Intersection.

2. Gain an understanding of the Warrants used to identify intersections being proposed as a signalized intersection.

3. Review a number of the low cost safety improvements that can be used with Signalized intersections.

4. Introduce some of the innovative intersection designs that can be used with or without signalization to enhance the intersection.

 

The course content includes:

* Understanding the effect of signalization on intersection safety

* Understanding the eight Warrants outlined in the MUTCD for signalized intersections

* Low cost safety features that can be used on signalized intersections

* Innovative intersection design for signalized and non-signalized intersections.

In any organization, the most valued part of that organization is its employees. As an organization, tribal or non-tribal, a risk assessment needs to be completed for all of the job tasks performed for the tribal organization. The only way to protect your tribal members is to identify the hazards that they work with and then mitigate those hazards. One serious injury or fatal accident to a tribal member is one too many. Employee safety cannot be after thought; it only takes a fraction of a second to have someone seriously hurt or killed. This workshop will demonstrate the key features in developing an Employees Safety program to protect those employees. We will examine the key injury and fatality areas in both Administration and Enterprise work areas for most tribal organizations. We will also identify resources for the training and education of that workforce.

 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing the Employee Safety course, participants will be able to:

1. Identify the hazards and risks involved in their daily work tasks.

2. Describe the four methods used to protect an employee.

3. Understand the importance of developing and managing an Employee Safety Plan.

4. Demonstrate the tools available to the organization when planning for your employee’s safety.

 

Agenda:

* Introductions

* Key safety concerns for most organizations

* High risk type of work.

* Five key elements in protecting an Employee.

* Workshop on using the five key elements to Safety

* Example of Safety Concerns

* Resources that are available.

 

Who should take this course:

This class has been developed to provide safety training to managers and workers alike. Tribal engineers, road supervisors, council members, office staff, crew leaders, equipment operators,

and laborers will learn how to reduce the dangers found on the job site and in the workplace. Attendees will begin to think about safety every day on every job, reducing the risk of serious injury or death.

This class is created for newly injury prevention practitioners or child passenger safety technicians who are exploring child passenger safety. This course is designed to help practitioners understand how to develop the basic documents needed for a child passenger safety program. This training will discuss how to collect program data and maintain program deliverables, program documents are needed for program management.

Upon completion of this class, students will be able to 1. Understand the purpose of a Tribal car seat program application, 2. Identify program liability waivers, education materials, and checkpoint forms, 3. Have the tools to create a car seat checkpoint flyer, and 4. Develop a photo and video release form and a program volunteer waiver.

 

Developing your Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) can be challenging, especially for low funded Tribes.   In this online training session, students will receive guidance on basic elements of developing strategies for transportation projects that are eligible for funding within the next 3-5 years.  

 Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Understand the importance of coordinating with federal and state planning to leverage funding.  2. Describe the process of identifying the gap between the Tribe’s vision/goals and what currently exists. 3. Understand how to use the FHWA TTIP Template. 

Students will learn the basics of preventive maintenance and daily inspection of heavy equipment used in building and maintaining roads. Students will be provided with various checklists to use for maintenance and inspection of equipment back at their respective tribal locations. 

 Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1) Identify the major causes of machine breakdown and how to reduce or eliminate these causes through effective preventive maintenance and regular inspection and 2) Know how to perform a proper daily or pre-use inspection of most types of heavy equipment and machinery used in road maintenance work. 

Getting your project off the ground can sometimes be challenging when there are so many details involved.  In this online class, students will learn the appropriate steps to take when starting a project.  We will review the basics of project management and how planning, organizing, controlling, and measuring a project is key to success.  Students will learn the project life cycle and how each phase of a project leads to the next. Students will gain an understanding of the role of a project manager and how their leadership has a large impact on team and project success. 

 Upon completion of the class, students will be able to: 1.) Construct a project roadmap 2.) Describe key elements of project management 3.) Define the project cycle. 4.) Define and initiate a planning process 5.) Identify the role of the project manager 6.) Summarize the communication process and its critical role in project success 7.) Select a project team and identify their roles.

There are approximately over 1.6 million miles of unpaved roads in the United States. Cities, counties and tribal nations share a common goal and that is the desire to design safe, long-lasting roads. In this online class, supervisors and operators will gain a better understanding of the materials, techniques, and equipment needed for maintaining gravel roads. Students will learn details about road design from construction to reshaping as well as recognizing the necessity of proper drainage. We will also describe many aspects of road maintenance from the grading process to material replacement.  

 Upon successful completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Identify best practices for gravel road maintenance; 2. Describe the important of proper drainage on gravel roads; 3. List reasons for grading gravel roads; 4. Apply best practices in various road maintenance scenarios; 5. Select appropriate grading techniques needed to improve a gravel road; 6. Explain the use of culverts and how to install them; and 7. Identify techniques and applications to stabilize the road.

This online training class provides a basic introduction on how to conduct a car seat checkpoint. Students will gain practical knowledge related to event and program planning, CPS roles and goals, event marketing and partnership building. This class is helpful for organizations that are putting a car seat check together at a safety fair or other setting.  

Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. List necessary steps to conduct a car seat checkpoint; 2. List resources necessary to conduct a car seat checkpoint; and 3. Effectively plan a car seat checkpoint.

Intersection crashes can be significantly reduced in Tribal lands by the application of proven intersection measures for rural and suburban/urban intersections.   The online class presents examples of intersection safety countermeasures for design, operations, and low cost safety improvements.   Examples are presented along with their specific safety benefits in the form of crash reduction factors.  Topics covered include: seven characteristics of a safe intersection, different types of intersections used to manage traffic, common geometric problems that could be a safety risk and how to fix them, how to use signage for intersections, and how to maintain sight triangles. 

Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Understand the cost in lives for crashes at intersections. 2. Identify seven characteristics that make an intersection safe. 3. Describe the types of traffic control used to manage different volumes of vehicles through intersections. 4. Understand the features that describe the geometry of an intersection and how they influence motorists. 5. Identify common geometric problems that could create a safety risk and how to fix them. 6. Understand how to use signs correctly to improve safety at intersections. 7. List different types of countermeasures to improve intersection safety and how to how to implement them. 8. Describe the importance of sight triangles and how to calculate them. 

 

Students will become familiar with temporary erosion and sediment control devices and basic procedures for proper installation. The proper purpose and function of each device, including the required material, maintenance and typical problems, will be reviewed. Students will gain a general understanding of storm water pollution problems and the components of a storm water pollution prevention plan.  

Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Explain storm water pollution; 2. Define Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SW3P) and the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs); 3. List types of erosion and sediment control devices; 4. Identify proper installation practices of both erosion and sediment control applications; 5. Select the appropriate BMP for various sediment and erosion control challenges; 6. Perform routine inspections of installed BMP’s; and 7. Apply appropriate corrective measures to maintain BMPs. 

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation system using satellites that orbit the earth multiple times within a 24-hour period.  These satellites transmit information to GPS receivers, which use the information to calculate the distance between the satellite and receiver.  A GPS receiver can triangulate its location on the ground with the proper number of signals, generating a 3D position (latitude, longitude, and elevation). This online class provides information about GPS and applications for its use in the transportation field. 

 Upon completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Explain the principles of Global Positioning Systems; 2. Explain the required information needed for a GPS to determine a 3D position; 3. Set up a GPS receiver; 4. Plot points on a map; 5. Take a position fix; 6. Explain latitude and longitude; and 6. Explain the application of GPS within Geographic Information Systems (GIS). 

Low Cost Safety Improvements (LCSI) is an online class condensed from Road Safety 365.  It is designed to provide Tribal agencies with practical and effective ways to implement low cost safety solutions into their day-to-day activities, reducing collisions, injuries, and fatalities.  Topics discussed include the need to make roads safer, road safety myths vs. realities, how to “read the road” and improve safety in your community, and practical and proven low cost countermeasures for safety.  

 Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Explain the need for making roads safer. 2. Separate safety myths from reality. 3. Demonstrate how to “read the road.” 4. Describe practical and low-cost countermeasures to improve safety, both on existing roads and during road projects. 5. List existing resources to address potential safety issues and concerns as they arise. 

As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation increases. Any organization capable of properly installing and maintaining storm drainage pipe provides a valuable service to the citizens they support. In this online class, students will review the proper installation and maintenance practices of storm drainage pipe.  Students will review current industry standards for both flexible and rigid pipe options.  Students will discuss effective practices that prevent damaging culverts during installation. 

 Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Identify flexible and rigid storm drainage pipe options; 2. Define the importance/benefits of proper pipe installation and maintenance practices; 3. Properly install and maintain both flexible and rigid pipe; 4. Describe common culvert installation and maintenance practices; 5. Define basic trench and embankment terminology; 7. Illustrate proper and safe excavation techniques; 8. Explain the importance of proper bedding; and 9. Describe proper maintenance techniques. 

Procurement 101 is an online class that provides a case-study of the largest political corruption case in FBI history.  Procurement standards are illustrated on the “CLAW” of the bear.  Procurement standards and requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will be detailed. The Instructor will guide the students through a demonstration of the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and a SAMs profile.   

 Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to: 1. Understand the consequences of not following State, Local and Tribal governments’ procurement standards.  2. Be familiar with the 5 procurement levels and standards as illustrated in the “CLAW”.  3. Recognize the importance of guidelines set forth in the 2 CFR Cost Principles and Super circular handout. 4. Identify the steps necessary to obtain a DUNS# and create a SAMSs profile.

For years, governments have allowed public utilities to utilize the right-of-way of streets and highway. Coordinating with these public utilities prior to the construction or reconstruction of a highway or road is critical for a successful project. Utility issues are one of the main reasons for delays and scheduling issues of highway projects. Planners and designers must know the proper procedures for coordinating with utilities during the design phase of a project. In this online class, students will gain knowledge in working with utilities during the design phase of a project, strategies in successful utility coordination to avoid delays, and safety concerns during utility relocation.  

 Upon successful completion of the class, students will be able to:   1.) Understand the role of working with utilities in the different phases of project development. 2.) Identify the federal regulations pertaining to utilities. 3.) Establish good communications with utility companies. 4.) Understand the role of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and environmental concerns during design and reconstruction projects. 5) Plan utilities for safe reconstruction projects.